Join the Discussion

To create a fundamental shift in the way the international community is responding to the continuing crisis in Syria, a Resilience Development Forum will be held in November, 2015 in Jordan. You have a unique opportunity to be part of that effort and help shape a new Resilience Agenda for the protracted crisis in Syria and the subregion.

From 22 October to 05 November 2015 you can join an online discussion convened by UNDP that is based on three discussion papers:

  1. Private Sector Engagement in the Syria Crisis – Englishعربي
  2. Social Stability – Syrian Neighbouring Countries – Englishعربي
  3. Aid Architecture for Resilience in the Syria Crisis – Englishعربي

The result of this online discussion will be brought directly to high level panels at the Resilience Development Forum, along with the discussion papers and the outcomes of country-led consultations. The expected outcome is a new way of responding to protracted conflicts.

Some of the authors of these papers are moderators of the online discussion and ready to discuss your ideas.

Question:  What does a Resilience Agenda look like for the protracted crisis in Syria and the region?

  1. What are the three key elements that should be in a Resilience Agenda, according to you or your organization?
  2. Based on your response to question one, what actions will you, your organisation or your government take to contribute to the Resilience Agenda?

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Meet your Moderators

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Marcos Neto for Private Sector Engagement Jos De la Haye Ph.D. for Social Stability Simona Marinescu Ph.D. for Aid Architecture
UNDP Team Manager, Private Sector and Foundations Team UNDP Cluster Leader,
Governance and Peacebuilding
UNDP Director/Chief,
Development Impact Group
 Istanbul, Turkey Amman, Jordan New York, USA
Prior to joining UNDP, Marcos was Global Technical Advisor for Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Risk Reduction at ChildFund International, where he has also served as Regional Development Officer for the Northeast US. Jos brings over 20 years of experience in the field of governance and peacebuilding with assignments fostering social cohesion and citizen security, dialogue processes, conflict analysis, infrastructures for peace, new technologies and peace building, youth and peace building and electoral violence prevention to crisis affected countries. Simona Marinescu is Chief Development Impact in UNDP coordinating performance analysis and development effectiveness, including knowledge management and innovation, South-South Cooperation and the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation.

 

What does a Resilience Agenda look like for the protracted crisis in Syria and the region?

The impact of the protracted nature of the Syria crisis is felt globally on all aspects of development be it social, political, economic and environmental. According to the latest Global Peace Index (2015), a USD 14.3tn (£9.21tn) cost has been imposed on the global economy in 2014 alone.  As the world shifts between security and insecurities, we are learning that the solution to global challenges is resting in global actions. This realization has galvanized the effort to present a resilience development agenda for an international consensus on an approach to minimize the costs and losses, be that monetary or moral.

Over 04 million Syrians have sought refuge in neighbouring countries, putting immense pressure on basic services and exacerbating social tensions. The leadership of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, the Republic of Lebanon, the Republic of Turkey, the Republic of Iraq and the Arab Republic of Egypt are fundamental to ensure protection and humanitarian assistance, and to strengthen the resilience of host communities in the region. Through the 3RP and the Syria Response Plan, international partners are combining innovations and development resources and capacities for a more effective response to the crisis.

The Resilience Development Forum (RDF) is hosted by the Government of Jordan, and convened by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), within the framework of the Regional Refugee and Resilience Plan (3RP) and the Regional United Nations Development Group. A Resilience Agenda will be discussed, debated and drafted to include shared commitments and actions to develop resilience in the region.

We believe, that the resilience agenda must be able to embed actions in the institutional, social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable development, in an effort to bring back peace, dignity and the future for the people whose lives have been disrupted by the protracted nature of the Syrian crisis.

  • Jason M.

    Testing the forum comments

  • Suresh Kumar

    Crisis in Syria and the region is due to Arms suppliers in the USA or some other countries. If the supplies of Arms and ammunitions is effectively stopped then who will fight and with whom. USA and the other arms manufacturing countries should ban the supply of arms and the struggle will itself end.

    • Najet Karaborni

      yes I qgree but qlso it is needed to restore and build confidence and trust and work together to offer the minimum of conditions of decent life following a participatory process and civic engagement

  • Santiago Roberto Bertoglia

    GRACIAS POR ESTA OPORTUNIDAD PARA LA AGENDA

    1- RESPETAR Y VALORAR LAS VÍCTIMAS, SUS SITUACIONES ACTUALES Y LAS REPARACIONES PARA QUE ALCANCEN SUS VIDAS DIGNAS. ES AQUÍ DONDE LAS NACIONES UNIDAS EN CONVENIO CON LA CORTE PENAL INTERNACIONAL HACEN ESFUERZOS PARA QUE LAS VÍCTIMAS SE COMUNIQUEN CON http://www.icc-cpi.int/en_menus/icc/structure%20of%20the%20court/office%20of%20the%20prosecutor/siac/Pages/default.aspx

    2- LAS NACIONES UNIDAS HACEN CONTACTO CON LAS VÍCTIMAS Y COLABORAN CON ELLAS FACILITANDO EL ACCESO A LA JUSTICIA, OTORGAR ACCESO A INTERNET PARA QUE ENVÍEN SUS CARTAS A LA CPI. VALE DECIR APOYO CON PERSONAL DE NACIONES UNIDAS, CIVIL, POLICIAL Y MILITAR
    3- ASEGURAR EFECTIVAMENTE QUE LAS VÍCTIMAS PARTICIPEN DE LOS PROCEDIMIENTOS DE LA CORTE PENAL INTERNACIONAL. Y EN SIMULTANEO CONOZCAN Y APRENDAN SUS DERECHOS HUMANOS PARA QUE PUEDAN VOLVER A CASA Y CONTINÚEN CON SUS VIDAS. PUEDAN ENSEÑAR LOS DERECHOS HUMANOS JUNTO A LAS NACIONES UNIDAS EN SU PAÍS SIRIA.

  • Santiago Roberto Bertoglia

    RESPUESTA PREGUNTA 2
    HOY LAS FAMILIAS PARTES DEL PUEBLO DE LA NACIÓN ARGENTINA INTENTAN ENVIAR SUS CARTA YA QUE ESTÁN SOBREVIVIENDO A GOBIERNOS CRIMINALES VISTOS EN MUCHOS PAÍSES.
    ESTOY SEGURO QUE EL PUEBLO DE LA NACIÓN ARGENTINA SE FORTALEZCA PODRÁ PONER TODA SU CAPACIDAD PARA IMPEDIR EL SUFRIMIENTO DE CUALQUIER FAMILIA EN CUALQUIER PAÍS DEL MUNDO.
    CON RESPECTO AL GOBIERNO, JAMÁS UN GOBIERNO CRIMINAL ARGENTINO A COLABORADO CON EL PUEBLO, JAMÁS COLABORARÁ CON LOS PUEBLOS DEL MUNDO

  • Jorge Augusto Ottoni Nobre Oli

    O Mundo não pode colocar barreiras que venham a tirar o direito de fuga de cidadãos em regiões de conflitos. Os governos de todo o mundo devem ser responsáveis pelo acolhimento e cuidado de uma parcela destes cidadãos . Definir o percentual e os direitos de quem está em condição de migrante de guerra, deve ser o papel da ONU neste momento. Os países que são parte do conflito devem financiar grande parte do acolhimento dos migrantes de guerra. Somos todos filhos da mesma casa ! ! !

  • pablo kaplan

    Three key elements needed are;
    Information on the needs. DATA
    Ability to reach those in need. LOGISTCS
    suppot team clise enough without risk. TEAMS

    • simona marinescu

      Dear Pablo, I am asking colleagues in our offices in the region to connect you with relevant UN and non-UN entities to take this conversation forward. Social entrepreneurship is what can actually help with affordable solutions and products to meet the growing demand in poor communities.

  • Najet Karaborni

    Build confidence is the first step. The second one is to stop and ban arm supply and delivery; and the third one is to improve the life conditions of citizens especially of those who lost everything !

    • simona marinescu

      Dear Najet Karaborni, confidence is the foundation of stability in any society. Once weapons talk, there is no confidence anymore. Restoring confidence is a much longer and laborious process, for which positive leadership is needed. Arm supply would not be a profitable business if hatred and desperation were not there in the first place. The simple disappearance of weapons will stop the killing, which is the major objective of all UN efforts, but that alone will not build the social fabric back. Our resilience agenda is meant at strengthening human engagement in the community inside and outside Syria and we look forward to the deliberations of the forum.

      • Najet Karaborni

        OK SIMONA and thank you for your comment! But without confidence there is no trust and there is fear and with no trust and fear nothing will happen! of course civic engagement is key and participatory process inside and outside Syria but at the same time and even before it is a must to build trust and confidence to be able to work together and advance!

  • TomRizzo

    Isn’t what is needed far above anything else an all-out, all hands on deck, everyone invited, all issues fair game push to END THE HOSTILITIES? I cannot comprehend how the permanent members of the Security Council do not understand this, seeing the massive spillover effect and costs. Any items on the resilience agenda will be putting bandages on a gushing, open wound. The bleeding must be stopped, and anything short of that is an unacceptable half-measure, domed to failure.

    • Jaqueline Koning

      TomRizzo’s comment goes to the heart of the matter. First and foremost peace is needed to start any kind of rebuilding effort. But as long as influential members of the UN Security Council are engaged in a proxy war reminiscent of the cold war era, it is difficult to see how peace in Syria is to be negotiated. In the meantime the Syrian population are paying the price with significant spill-over to Europe. The solution? As a matter of ‘operating principle’, the UN should adopt a resolution that states that any time a country sitting on the UN Security Council is a party (even an indirect party or a ‘coalition member’ party) to conflict, said country should forfeit voting rights in the Security Council in respect of decisions relating to the specific area of conflict.

      • TomRizzo

        That is an EXCELLENT idea! Implementation might be a problem, since states will deny involvement, but we probably have necessary mechanisms to verify this. I say we should push for this!

        • simona marinescu

          While all of the above is true and visionary, communities outside Syria are affected by the spillovers of conflict, migration, and the devastating impact of market disruptions. Long after the conflict stops, these communities will still be under stress as displaced Syrians will not return too soon. UNHCR revised the average duration of refuge and displacement from 17 to 25 years. Some people will never return. In Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq Kurdistan, Turkey and Egypt, these displaced people share with their host communities limited resources, basic services, and jobs. The resilience agenda is meant to mitigate the socio-economic impact of the Syrian crisis before any fresh conflict sets in. I agree that the political process should see some progress for all the resilience gains to grow, but, as our papers argue, some socio-economic developments may actually make the political environment more conducive to a good outcome. We are hopeful that some options will emerge from the Resilience Development Forum debates. Many thanks for a great exchange of ideas.

    • Leah Odongo

      I couldn’t agree more with you TomRizzo. I also believe that all other items on the resilence agenda will merely serve to dress the wound

  • Rodrigo Torres Vicent

    First of all, we must to recognise that some places in Syria have been devastated and the grade of destruction is much more intense than simply walls. Under this scenario, the question is, displaced people want to come back? They want to reconstruct the cities? Why?, beside the obvious reason linked with the ancestral territory.
    I have been with refugees in the past and they say have the intention to come back but, they are not interested particulary about the regime or whether this is a dictature, or a right goverment or comunist. They are specting return to a land abble to offer a minimum level of security, where chindren can to go to school, where they can to go out without fear. They ask, why occidental countries didn’t help them and yes with the opposition to Assad. Ok, they answer, in many countries of the world exists dinasties, dictatures, no democracy, but things always go ahead. So, why?
    So, the first step, I think, is recognise in front of the syrian people that we fail, The UN failed, reacted a litle bit late. An underestimated internal problem, becames a global. If UN doesn’t recognise this, risks to make the mistake to give a medicine who has no asked for. But that is not the main problem, the great problem is the risk that Syria after the intervention can become in a new Haiti, where people really don’t like live anymore under the Minustah “protection”. So, for not repeat past wrong, the UN should bring back the confidence and the faith in the future to the syrian people. Unfortunately is to early if Russia and the Occidental block are fighting for Assad possition and his destiny.
    When UN could solve this, and also the problem with the resistance and opposition block, the kurdish possition ant the ISIS offensive, ok, let’s go.
    Syria is one of the cradle of the civilization and this fact could be the argument to empower people for the desire of backing.
    Then or simultaneous, make a work of negociation as the same of Bernardino Leon in Libia. Promote the peace and arbitrate a referendum in wich syrian people decide the regime under who want to remain, califato, dictature, democracy, emirate. Who can vote: all the syrian inside the territory and outside with a cart of refugee, and of course the million of syrians into the bourdering countries without a refugee’s quality but abble to demostrate its nationality.
    What can we do with ISIS or Al Qaeda groups if they don’t want to seat on talks and could threatens me? I really don’t know, but as a psychologist i’m sure, I can not persuade him to change his mind about me, because as they say, we represent an opposite and contradictory vision of the world.

    • simona marinescu

      Dear Rodrigo Torres Vicent, I respect your views and totally share the frustration of seeing so many people suffering because of no political solution in Syria after long years of war and destruction. All UN member states are sovereign nations. Respect for sovereignty is one of the most significant achievements of seven decades of political diplomacy that the UN has fostered. The UN is present in Syria and is the only organization trying to bring all actors around the table and agree on a positive way forward for the country and its people. But it is ultimately the will of people that will drive the future of Syria. Elections as you rightly say should give them the opportunity to decide. Elections though require some stability to take place, otherwise they will fuel more bloodshed and displacement. Rest assured that, with all means possible, the UN will continue to keep the dialog open. Imagine what could happen if no UN were involved at all. The upcoming Resilience Development Forum will bring under the same roof governments, civil society, donors, development partners, humanitarian organization to try further define new scenarios of involvement. That wouldn’t have been possible without the UN to convene all relevant institutions and leaders. I am sure our conversation will continue during the forum and after and I would like to thank you once again for your genuine comments.

      • Rodrigo Torres Vicent

        Thankyou very much Simona for your comment. I’m sure UN is working hard for a solution to a Syrian problem and it must continue to do it. I can just add that as a simply citizen of the woand rld not member of no one organization, I see syrian people sad and terribly alone while two bigs of UN with veto power still playing to a thirth world war without seeing their faces, worst, using the syrian regime one, and the rebel oppossition the other, testing new bombs, missiles and combat strategies in a new type of outsoursing war. Of this, UN, NATO, Europe and Comunist bloc are simply witnesses. This is sad.

  • Bernard-Lutete

    Dear All,

    The Syrian crisis is really intricate and can affect all the region even Europe if we are not able to well care about it, the situation is becoming day by day, more bad and worse, and has to be considered with all its international complexity and urgently, with consequences increasing every day.

    The International community and The United Nations with all their international instruments and diplomatic ways, passing by the Security Council, Nato, etc, must first of all doing their best to stop the war, to stop the killing of innocent civilians, and secondly install a strong network of humanitarian system in order to help victims who are already in bad positions.

    The United Nations have also to study the possibility of establishing in the country The United Nations observation and stabilization Mission, and the last, the international community and The United Nations have to do their best to impose by means of diplomatic pressure and ways, an open dialogue between all the protagonist, The Syrian president and oppositions, Included Russia, USA and France Especially at the international level.

    We have to underline that Dialogue has to be prioritized instead of war option, and the opposition cannot be armed!

    Regards,

    Bernard Lutete

    • simona marinescu

      Dear Bernard Lutete, thank you for taking the time to share your views. The United Nations established a mission in Syria to contribute to peace building as you rightly suggested. Link to the UNSMIS website is here http://www.un.org/en/peacekeeping/missions/past/unsmis/ . Very correct, it is the dialog that may yield solutions and it should soon lead to an agreement. In the process, our resilience agenda takes care of people, the people who are already displaced and who are trying to find solutions for their families to survive the trauma of uncertainty and deprivation of basic services and income. We are confident that deliberations in the Resilience Development Forum will be creative and forward looking to restore hope for these deeply suffering millions of Syrians and their host communities.

  • Gorden Simango

    Resilience in this context must consider:

    – Addressing the underlying causes of the conflict; and a return to peace.
    – The international community must step up to its responsibility towards refugees and IDPs. There is a currently a significant funding gap to meet the basic and protection needs of affected populations.
    – Think about the future of affected populations and begin to invest in that not only meeting today’s needs (for example education, the young people and their needs for today and tomorrow, reconciliation & non-violence).
    – Well-being of affected populations; and the right policy frameworks and their right implementation; upholding and fulfilling the human rights of refugees and IPDs as per international standards and norms.

    • simona marinescu

      Dear Gorden, that transition from the humanitarian response to investing in the future of affected populations as you put it is precisely the resilience framework we are talking about. You have very well defined the roadmap that can help communities and people in distress to restore their livelihoods and become more resilient to conflict and shocks. To finance such a programme, we put together an analysis in the Aid Architecture paper that I encourage you to read. I look forward to continuing this discussion.

  • Sajjad

    If I take the literal meaning of resilience and read question 1 to seek ways for returning to stable entity or entities, I would say,

    identify the internal (within bounds of Syria) social entities that hold potential to survive without any external assistance.

    Identify the minimal set of issues, which ought to include end of violence and an agreement to retain the integrity of Syria, even if it be in a loose confederate form;

    Humanitarian supports to allow negotiations among the groups.

  • Frodi Far (Fathin)

    The world must unite to help this crisis.

    • simona marinescu

      UNDP stands ready to foster this dialog for a united response and for joint action. Uniting around a series of clear objectives will facilitate progress. What should these objectives be to ensure interventions lead to solutions is an interesting topic for discussion and the core of the 3RP Plan 2015-2016 proposal. The world is all of us. This is why your opinion matters as much as everyone else’s. Look forward to discussing further.

  • Maria Cristina Silveira

    In my personal opinion, syrian people should think about avoiding only one religion beliefs, acting beyond religion radicalism, in a more neutral way, even if they migrate to another country. To be more resilient, syrians should borrow some ways of thinking, such as forgiviness, compassion and acceptance. Think that we are part of the human kind, not of a religion. Forget about differences. I know it is very difficult, but it is the present solution. Government won’t help them, so humanitarian organizations have to do this, with global help.

    • simona marinescu

      Indeed, Maria Cristina Silveira, common values of tolerance and respect for human rights regardless of beliefs and ethnicity are key prerequisites for peace and stability. Cultural reforms are as important as development interventions and they certainly matter for resilience. Education is what will change dynamics in the region, but peace should come first. Let us remain engaged until these nations will reach the shore of stability and cohesion.

    • Bushra Hassan

      the idea that the entire onus of resilience falls on the ‘victims’ is a bit preposterous. To also assume that an entire nation lacks the ability to forgive, or show compassion shows a general lack of understanding. Perhaps the reverse is true! that the syrian crisis should not be seen as a ‘muslim’ crisis or a ‘middle east’ crisis and instead taken as a humanitarian crisis and the resolution of such only comes from humanitarian and eventually, development concerns.

  • Nader

    For Syria to stand on its own two feet it must be resilient to the pressures of the outside world to drive its agenda. Syria if it needs anything, needs to drive its own agenda and not allow anyone else impose outside solutions. The outside world should then support what Syria identifies as the areas of support they need. This is the only way Syria will succeed in preventing its total disintegration.

    • simona marinescu

      Dear Nader, from a non-political organization perspective, Syria represents a multitude of communities, families and individuals in critical need of access to food, shelter and other basic services including health, education, social protection. UNDP and other UN agencies respond to people’s priorities and national agendas wherever nationally endorsed agendas exist. We very much hope that Syria will soon find its way to close the conflict and become one nation in the shape it wants and with the set of goals it defines. Until such time, Syria crisis continues to expand beyond the immediate neighborhood as a regional and cross-region problem. As our colleagues from the World Bank recently stated, Syria’s stability is a global public good. While you are absolutely right that the solutions are always inside and should be mobilized from within, the impact of a crisis of such a breath on the region and on the host communities in Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Turkey, and Egypt is significant and demands a response that Syria simply cannot provide. Hence the formulation of the resilience agenda that the forum aims to discuss.

  • Irshad Ahmad Mughal

    There are two types of resilience they should learn: (a) internal resilience; (b) external resilience. Internally they should overcome their fear, agony and insecurity..its easy to say but difficult to overcome, but this type of resilience help a person/community to create hope from inside. They should also learn how to live in small communities/groups. When we are in fear, collective action help us to overcome it and provide more energy to resist.

  • Samer Mousa

    الحقيقة
    التي يجب عدم اغفالها، أن تجدد العنف والحروب الأهلية، وخاصة الأزمات التي طال
    أمدها والتي تمر أو من المخطط أن تمر في مرحلة انتقال تتطلب نهجاً متعددة ومتميزة،
    لضمان صورة واقعية من الاستجابة والشراكة، مما يخلق مزيداً من التحديات يجب
    الاستجابة لها، وفي سياقات عديدة، يجب أن يتم تقديم المساعدة الإنسانية بالتزامن
    مع جهود بناء السلام والتنمية في ويجب على الهيئات الدولية أن تكون مجهزة للانتقال
    بسرعة وفعالية بين هذين النهجين .

  • Wonesai W Sithole

    there is need to focus more on local based solution as foundation for resilience building

    • simona marinescu

      Very true, Wonesai W Sithole. States and markets under such a stress should be rebuilt from below. Local interventions that do not depend on central authorities are more likely to succeed in such times. UNDP works within the community, involving private sector, civil society and individuals to come up with solutions. Peace and stability may also gain traction if communities get engaged. Please read the 3RP Plan 2015-2016 http://www.3rpsyriacrisis.org and further provide feedback. Thank you.

  • Wonesai W Sithole

    I have a framework that could be used to deal with this situation unfortunately I am failing to load it

    • simona marinescu

      Dear Wonesai W Sithole, please provide key elements of your framework. It would be very interesting to engage in a more specific discussions on potential solutions. Colleagues will revert with a technical answer as to how you can upload the document. Thank you!

    • https://twitter.com/RomoloTassone RomoloTassone

      Dear Wonesai, Can you please email the document to romolo.tassone@undp.org and I can try attach it for you.

      Regards
      Romolo Tassone
      Project manager of online global consultations that enable civic engagement with the UN and governments.

  • Enas Mohamed

    It is rather tricky to try and contain the entirety of the Syrian crisis and its
    mitigation in a mere three elements, but I believe that the following are crucial
    and are imperative to address when considering orchestrating a Resilience Agenda:
    1- better optimize legal channels for migration and movement so as to ensure
    protection of migrants and asylum seekers and hampering both human trafficking and
    migrants smuggling into borders or via the sea, 2- providing support with
    having to build opportunities such as job and education opportunities and
    ensuring resilience building in affected communities and societies, 3- detecting
    and tackling the root causes of the Syrian crisis, finding a way through
    mediation and consultation to better mitigate the challenge and sharing,
    thereafter, the responsibilities on the basis of shared interests and values
    amongst the nations. Another such important issue to tackle is “social
    segregation” as it has been reported that most of the immigrants fare worse
    than their non-immigrant peers in terms of employment and education. There is a
    pressing need to address the problem especially that a failure to fully
    integrate them within their host communities/ countries only leads to a sense
    of discontent.

    In order to fully adopt the Resilience Agenda, and as mentioned previously, it is
    crucial to detect the underlying, root causes of the crisis and in such a case,
    extremism looms large. There is a need for awareness to be raised so as to
    prevent people, and especially the youth, to further join such radical groups.
    A better sense of awareness and a solidified education can help prevent and
    mitigate such a crisis from further growing.

    • simona marinescu

      Thank you for your thoughtful comments, Enas Mohamed. The 3RP Plan 2015-2016 covers all aspects of national and regional interventions for resilience http://www.3rpsyriacrisis.org . The three papers are meant to flag topics on which we seek more consultations with the global community. They capture three potential enablers for more rapid progress: social cohesion, private sector participation and a new architecture of funding to multiply impact of all spending and increase returns. UNDP works closely with all actors, but problems expand fast. Winter is coming and people need more sustainable solutions in addition to food and shelter. As there own leaders failed them, they now seek to be covered by other countries’ social contracts, which, while feasible, also requires comprehensive planning and commitment. People have the strength and determination to end their own suffering, we just need to unleash that power by providing them with basic services and decent jobs. Political organizations are doing their part. UNDP is a development agency, the largest of the United Nations, and we are committed to making a change, stoping migration, helping the region to get over destruction and economic slowdown and creating employment for all the jobless regardless of who they are. The United Nations is the only organization on the ground and we will not leave until the job is done. All your ideas are valuable and we hope we will continue this conversation.

  • Claude Alex Ndambi Moutandi

    La crise de la Syrie ne peut être résolu que par le dialogue. Les armes n’y peuvent rien.
    On a trop attendu. Les dirigeants du monde ont trop hésité. maintenant il faut agir. Trop vies ont été perdues.
    S’asseoir, discuter et surtout s’accorder.

    • simona marinescu

      Le conflit est réversible, la mort n’est pas. C’est toujours le dialogue qui peut faciliter une solution. Nous espérons que ce forum va changer la dynamique dans la région en ce qui concerne l’engagement de toutes les personnes et les institutions responsables.

  • http://www.undp.org Ashwini Sathnur

    Question 1:-

    Reducing/ eliminating the intensity of crisis in Syria and the region is primary. Measures taken to do so has to aim at enhancing awareness among the community to minimize the causes that lead to the situation. Educating and reducing the ignorance/ negligence/ illiteracy levels is mandatory to achieve an inclusive and sustainable future. Creating scientific/ technological tools to foster greater understanding of the crisis and methods to cater to those problems, thereby suggesting solutions based on that protracted crisis is important. For eg. Persons who go missing due to the crisis situations could be tracked via ICT technological solutions.

    Question 2:-

    As a member of the the organization, mechanisms have to be brought to place which educate higher number of persons. Full employment of persons in the public – private sectors which create solutions based on the protracted crisis has to be achieved. Simultaneously disaster prevention and remedy management has to be put in place.

    • simona marinescu

      Dear Ashwini, both questions are very pertinent. UNDP has packages of interventions for crisis response and recovery and is present in Syria trying to the extent possible to help people in need. Local interventions are made to support businesses and create jobs, including through cash for work programs targeting youth and helping widowed women to make a living. As I stated in other replies, project type of interventions cannot significantly contribute to changes. It is because of that that we put together the 3RP Plan 2015-2016 to build resilience around Syria that will help displaced people who are the most vulnerable while also generating a positive impact in Syria. Value chains that cross the borders, remittances, knowledge sharing can make a difference. Education produce scalable results needs security and stability. This is what the 3RP Plan 2015-2016 aims to achieve. In the Resilience Development Forum, leaders will draw a roadmap to ensure all resources and interventions will converge towards one goal, which is empowering people to restore normality in Syria and around. We are using technology and innovative solutions in Syria and around. Please access UNDP Syria http://www.undp.org/content/syria/en/home.html, UNDP Jordan http://www.undp.org/content/jordan/en/home.html, UNDP Iraq http://www.undp.org/content/iraq/en/home.html, UNDP Turkey http://www.undp.org/content/turkey/en/home.html, UNDP Egypt http://www.undp.org/content/egypt/en/home.html as well as the regional response of UNDP http://www.arabstates.undp.org/content/rbas/en/home/library/CPR/regional-strategic-overview/ and share your thoughts with us. Thank you!

  • Djokam Poka Marius

    Syrian crisis is the major crisis that our international community are facing. Syrain population are desperate because of the crisis. And many of them are traveliing smuggled by sea for Europe at the peril of their lives. In order to end this phenomenon, it is urgent and important to work at the base with the Syrian population by putting in place a coaching program for peace. That takes into account all religious and cultural denominations. subsequently propose another self-coaching program of different community leaders and opinion that the state has syrian without politic and religious distinction.

    • simona marinescu

      Very true, Djokam Poka Marius. The solution can only be devised through continuous dialog and willingness to end the conflict and rebuild the social fabric and the economy for all people to benefit. The UN has in its current portfolio in the region the support to dialog for peace and we will continue to do so until we see all those countries prospering and enjoying stability. We appreciate your time for discussing with us and we hope we will continue to exchange views.

  • Jos De la Haye

    Hi all

    Thanks a lot for the contributions, they are very interesting and touch on really important elements to foster resilience.
    Understanding the root causes and listening to local solutions, building more solid and inclusive dialogue mechanisms to mitigate
    grievances causing fractures within society are indeed critical to the design of a way forward that can sustain. Points that resonate
    with what we hear from colleagues working in Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq, Turkey, Egypt and in Syria (where I am this week).
    Building on the many different initiatives already in progress today to enhance resilience at the local level through local governance and local development, but also enhancing access to justice, and addressing SGBV, enhanced local conflict mitigation mechanisms, enhance capacity of the parliament and bringing women more actively in decision-making process are all initiatives our community of practice is working on.
    Question, however, remains what can we do to level up the resilience impact of our work? Are we overlooking aspects in our work? How can we be more inclusive? How can we ensure that it all adds up? How to develop preventive governance structures?
    In your next contributions I look forward to hear more on what you consider key elements to further resilience? Linked to that what
    activity would you prioritise – your view as member to the community of practice feeds into the wider reflection currently ongoing to level up our current work.
    Tell us, what are your views? and please note that specific and concrete suggestions is what we are currently interested in, looking forward reading more !
    Greetings
    Jos

    • Aida robbana

      Bonjour Jos
      I was in Syria last month andyou asked about inclusiveness, I suggest that UNDP should use more UN agencies works and documents from the field, to consolidate its assessment of the current situation , such as WHO ( which is delivering its services in 5 field offices ) and Escwa which is trying to assess national statistical capacities with the national statistical body despite of the recent difficulties.
      Aida

      • simona marinescu

        Dear Aida, I am stepping in as I would like to contribute to this exchange. You made a very valid point regarding the importance of consistency, coherence and complementarities among UN agencies to make optimal use of all resources. Indeed, UNDP is the coordinator of the UN agencies present in country – the so called UN Country Team. Through joint planning and programming, UN agencies aim at ensuring we operate as one organization. We work closely with ESCWA in the region and we will definitely look into what you suggested to see as to how we harmonize our work with what the commission is doing. ESCWA will be present in the forum at the end of this week and we look forward to learning more about what their plans are for Syria and its neighbors moving forward. Thank you.

  • Melaku Geleta

    Melaku Geleta Wakjira

    Disaster Risk Managment & Livelihood Recovery Programme Coordinator

    United Nations Development Programme

    UNDP Ethiopia

    First of all dear moderator thank you for giving us this chance to comment on the fates of the people of Syria
    and other people living in neighboring countries from the other coroner of the world. We need to show our solidarity to the people suffering under protracted socio-political crisis. I think there is no humankind on this planet that its heart is not bleeding regarding what is going in that region and the middle east countries in general. We are simply observing the tragedy of the 21st century as if something is not happening elsewhere. As UN staff, I personally feel sorry on this. With regard to commenting on the issues of “the expected social stability” in Syria and then neighboring countries, I forward the following points for urgent remedy.

    A genuine understanding of the complete context of the crisis is very important and should be a primary task to all
    actors. I am sure this is not a hidden crisis from the UN and other “giants” of our day. I propose, in the name of 7
    billion people of our planet the UN must acknowledge this situation as a global failure, above all, it is the failure of the UN. I have a reason to say this. The UN early warning system was not responding to this crisis at early stage or has
    undermined the possible outcomes of such crisis while many actors are mobilizing their forces in the area i.e. within Syria and the neighboring countries territories. The protractor crisis in Syria and neighboring countries are the results of the sum total of
    those failures & negligence’s. I cannot say that the seven frontline UN agencies for managing early warning and early actions such as , the UN Department of Political Affairs, the UN Development Program (UNDP), the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the World International Peacekeeping, , the World Food Program (WFP), the Office for the High Commissioner for Refugees, (OHCHR), the Office of the Special Adviser of the Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide (OSAPG) and the Global Pulse (formerly known as the Global Impact and Vulnerability Alert System, or GIVAS are ignorant of this crisis while the situation was at infancy level. It was very difficult to someone to accept why this bureaus are failed to apply the golden principles for peace and security known as “early warning for early actions”.

    There was also some procedural issues to be questioned regarding the UN security council approval of external countries
    involvement in the affairs of those countries which was labeled as “crisis countries”. I can say that the UN who is a very giant organization with 70 years old global experiences, were not good in understanding of the concept of “Early warning for early action” or were not good enough to calculate the associated crisis coming following that decisions which actually make the mentioned region very frightening zone of the 21st century. “Thank for that action”, now Syria and other neighboring countries are converted to complete hell from partial
    “heaven”.
    The UN must define this crisis as a crisis resulted from the failures and unwise handling of the internal affairs of the nationals of those countries. Second, as a deliberate support of external actors used the opportunity for promoting proxy war strategy. Third, the UN needs to admit as its own failure to understand the context and miss calculation of the decisions of the security council. Because of theses all collective failures, the crisis now has grown to the levels of ideology backed type of actions, crisis and even attracted the involvements of different groups, countries, religions to be promoted beyond the mentioned countries
    boundary, etc.

    Given the above background, the forum should propose a global framework towards bringing stability in the region in particular, in the world in general. The framework must acknowledge our collective failures towards the crisis and propose a collective recommendations, accountability measures, including a positive involvements of the “giants of our day”, those who are still playing a childish game with their bomber aircrafts in the region, fuel the condition using the outdated slogan says “the enemy of my friend is my enemy or the enemy of my enemy is my friend”. If we failed to not bring a framework considering the above background contexts towards this forum, defiantly we are preparing for anticipated III world war that would take place out of this region sooner or later. Therefore ;

    Building resilience is not a simple task, as we are doing in the context of natural diastase or other development initiatives. To me the case of Syria and neighboring countries are out of such understanding & contexts. In this case, we may require to develop new definitions of bundling resilience for a protracted types of crisis. The situation in the region is now escalating & defusing to other nations in many ways, ideologically, politically, religiously, etc. Potentially will have another disaster in in many frontiers in a near future or in the long run. I believe this will cause the III WW unless we intervene as quickly as possible. We all must understand that the actual starring time of this crisis is some time back to the gulf war. Thanks to Tony Biller, the former UK Prime minster for admitting his failure last week for what has been done in Iraq during his time .In his statement he made clear that following Iraq crisis the region is under political and social turmoil. Our “giants” of today are not able to draw any lesson even after two decades of Iraq war and again continued with similar approaches. From what has been happening in this region, the expected social stability for resilience building in this regain could not be a single night achievement. It requires all actors’ genuine efforts. In the process, all involved actors in disturbing the regional stability (deliberately or wrongly) must admit their mistakes, compensate the people of Syria and other nations of the region for all moral, economic, human, material, social crisis. The formwork must consider these facts and should provide a working modalities to move forward the intended resilience building approach in the region.

    The position of the UN in this new regional resilience bundling initiative should be a confidence bundling type by its all forms to all actors involved in the process. For various reasons, the UN has failed to handle the situations properly. As a result an extended human sufferings are still there. I guess, this might have destroyed peoples trust on the UN. Syrian and other regional nationals has to reestablish their home country. The politics should come at later stage. Now humanity must come front. The UN must pay great attention on how to rehabilitate the destroyed countries, regardless of who is ruling , but need to take pre causations measure to not open more frontiers,” more heavens” to extremists grabbed the current opportunities & able to operating in the region. The new resilience building architecture should consider this context and forward a confidence building strategy in rehabilitations of the
    destroyed nations for social stability and quick remedy.

  • Salma Nashef

    My first contribution:

    1. Education
    It is very important to take education into consideration when thinking of Resilience.
    education can play a great role in the recovery of missed values that led mainly to violence and hostility which may be used a way to express the refugees loss of hometown.
    Education on both levels: for the refugees and the society that host them.
    Curriculum with it’s components especially teaching is very important but education is my 1st concern.

    2.Politics
    There should be more International & global institutions that will take care of refugees on all aspects in different parts of the world that facilitates their distribution among hosting countries.
    In addition there should be Negotiations with the formal President Al Assad to end the fight with the help of his friends like Iran & Russia, & we must not forget that the Syrian crisis is the responsibility of Syrian Leaders in the 1st consideration, comes next the UN, the International leaders & the community.

    3. Economy
    International organizations & countries should help more to fund the hosting countries in order to help them satisfy the refugees needs from an educational, economical, environmental & societal aspects.
    Jordan for example suffers too much from the great number of refugees it host & needs greater help to pay for the support of a good life for the refugees.

    Lastly, I can say that the presence of Al Assad these days is essential to help fight ISIS.

    • simona marinescu

      Thank you, Salma Nashef. Indeed, education is the driver for positive change. Unfortunately, insecurity and conflict disrupt the delivery of this important public service, private solutions being also crowded out by instability and safety concerns. We saw thousands of teachers fleeing Syria and Iraq and numerous schools deserted because of security threats. Restoring the system takes time. What we need to make sure is that we do not stop rebuilding schools and diversifying learning opportunities. We also nurture solidarity among countries in the region to devote resources to protecting livelihoods while investing in critical economic sectors. You have very well identified key problems and we would be grateful if you could share your thoughts on potential solutions. Looking forward to continuing our exchange.

      • Salma Nashef

        Hi Simon,

        Appreciating what did you wrote, I agree with you that resilience
        will take time & I add “with efforts”.

        We have two sides to work upon, the 1st is the The
        Syrian displaced people & the 2nd is the hosting one.

        For the Syrian Displaced people:
        1. I suggest to introduce the following courses in the curriculum:

        a. Arts that may help in reducing their stress & suffering

        b. Ethics & good behavior.
        Both courses should be translated into action in reality.

        c. Training courses for some careers that may help parents or the non educated persons in
        the family in providing it with it’s essential needs (at least).

        2. Take advantage of the fleeing teachers to different countries to teach other refugees,
        but this needs 1st counting for the numbers of the teachers in the
        country in order to distribute them according to need.

        3. Great concern towards cleanliness of the refugee environment to reduce the
        possibility of having diseases

        4. Xerox the books instead of having published new ones for the refugees which has it’s
        economical impact upon Government

        5. Reuse of the books for different levels of schools

        6. Planting trees to help purifying the space & environment in places where it is
        convenient to be planted in the hosted countries.

        For the Hosting communities:
        1. I see that a carefully chosen teachers of high standards of ethics & values which
        represent an excellent model is a must for both teaching of students and
        training of teachers.

        2. Pay great concern towards cleanliness of every aspect of life as a precaution against
        diseases.

        3. Give Incentives to contributors of action towards resilience.

        4. Planting trees to help purifying the space & environment in places where it is
        convenient to be planted in the hosted countries

        • simona marinescu

          Thank you, Salma. All great suggestions for a resilience plan that involves all age groups. We definitely must grant attention to vulnerabilities that these people developed, whether physical, emotional, or social, or all together.
          We will table all these ideas for discussions in the forum. Many thanks.

  • Melaku Geleta

    Social Stability – Syrian Neighboring Countries:

    Melaku Geleta Wakjira

    Disaster Risk Managment & Livlihood
    Recovery Programme Coordinator

    United Nations Development Programme

    UNDP Ethiopia

    First of all dear moderator thank you for giving us this chance to comment on the
    fates of the people of Syria and other people living in neighboring countries from the other coroner of the
    world. We need to show our solidarity to the people suffering under protracted socio-political crisis. I think there is no humankind on this planet that its heart is not bleeding regarding what is going in that region and the middle east countries in general. We are simply observing the tragedy of the 21st century as if something is not happening elsewhere. As UN staff, I personally feel sorry on this. With regard to commenting on the issues of “the expected social stability” in Syria and the neighboring countries, I forward the following points for urgent remedy.

    A genuine understanding of the complete context of the crisis is very important and should be a primary task to all
    actors. I am sure this is not a hidden crisis from the UN and other “giants” of our day. I propose, in the name of 7 billion people of our planet the UN must acknowledge this situation as a global failure, above all, it is the failure of the UN. I have a reason to say this. The UN early warning system was not responding to this crisis at early stage or has undermined the possible outcomes of such crisis while many actors are mobilizing their forces in the area i.e. within Syria and the neighboring
    countries territories. The protractor crisis in Syria and neighboring countries are the results of the sum total of
    those failures & negligence’s. I cannot say that the seven frontline UN agencies for managing early warning and early actions such as , the UN Department of Political Affairs, the UN Development Program (UNDP), the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the World International Peacekeeping, , the World Food Program (WFP), the Office for the High Commissioner for Refugees, (OHCHR), the Office of the Special Adviser of the
    Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide (OSAPG) and the Global Pulse (formerly known as the Global Impact and Vulnerability Alert System, or GIVAS are ignorant of this crisis while the situation was at infancy level. It was very difficult to someone to accept why this bureaus are failed to apply the golden principles for peace and security known as “early warning for early actions”.

    There was also some procedural issues to be questioned regarding the UN security council approval of external countries
    involvement in the affairs of those countries which was labeled as “crisis countries”. I can say that the UN who is a very giant organization with 70 years old global experiences, were not good in understanding of the concept of “Early warning for early action” or were not good enough to calculate the associated crisis coming following that decisions which actually make the mentioned region very frightening zone of the 21st century. “Thank for that action”, now Syria and other neighboring countries are converted to complete hell from partial “heaven”.

    The UN must define this crisis as a crisis resulted from the failures and unwise handling of the internal affairs
    of the nationals of those countries. Second, as a deliberate support of external actors used the opportunity for promoting proxy war strategy. Third, the UN needs to admit as its own failure to understand the context and miss calculation of the decisions of the security council. Because of theses all collective failures, the crisis now has grown to the levels of ideology backed type of actions, crisis and even attracted the involvements of different groups, countries, religions to be promoted beyond the mentioned countries
    boundary, etc.

    Given the above background, the forum should propose a global framework towards bringing stability in the region in particular, in the world in general. The framework must acknowledge our collective failures towards the crisis and propose a collective
    recommendations, accountability measures, including a positive involvements of the “giants of our day”, those who are still playing a childish game with their bomber aircrafts in the region, fuel the condition using the outdated slogan says “the enemy of my friend is my enemy or the enemy of my enemy is my friend”. If we failed to not bring a framework considering the above background contexts towards this forum, defiantly we are preparing for anticipated III world war that would take place out of this region sooner
    or later. Therefore ;

    Building resilience is not a simple task, as we are doing in the context of natural diastase or other development initiatives. To me the case of Syria and neighboring countries are out of such understanding & contexts. In this case, we may require to develop new definitions of bundling resilience for a protracted types of crisis. The situation in the region is
    now escalating & defusing to other nations in many ways, ideologically, politically, religiously, etc. Potentially will have another disaster in in many frontiers in a near future or in the long run. I believe this will cause the III WW unless we intervene as quickly as possible. We all must understand that the actual starring time of this crisis is some time back to the gulf war. Thanks to Tony Biller the former UK Prime minster for admitting his failure last week for what has been done in Iraq during his time .In his statement he made clear that following Iraq crisis the region is under political and social turmoil. Our day “giants” are not able to draw any lesson even after two decades of Iraq war and again continued with similar approaches. From what has been happening in this region, the expected social stability for resilience building in this regain could not be a single night achievement. It requires all actors’ genuine efforts. In the process, all involved actors in disturbing the regional stability (deliberately or wrongly) must admit their mistakes, compensate the people of Syria and other nations of the region for all moral, economic, human, material, social crisis. The formwork must consider these facts and should provide a working modalities to move forward the intended resilience building approach in the region.

    The position of the UN in this new regional resilience bundling initiative should be a confidence bundling type by its all forms to all actors involved in the process. For various reasons, the UN has failed to handle the situations properly. As a result an extended human sufferings are still there. I guess, this might have destroyed peoples trust on the UN. Syrian and other regional nationals has to reestablish their home country. The politics should come at later stage. Now humanity must come front. The UN must pay great
    attention on how to rehabilitate the destroyed countries, regardless of who is ruling , but need to take pre causations measure to not open more frontiers,” more heavens” to extremists grabbed the current opportunities & able to operating in the region. The new resilience building architecture should consider this context and forward a confidence building strategy in rehabilitations of the
    destroyed nations for social stability and quick remedy.

    • simona marinescu

      Dear Melaku Geleta, sincere gratitude for your consideration to the topic and to the three thematic papers that we shared ahead of the forum. The global framework you are suggesting is captured in the 3RP Plan 2015-2016 that UNDP prepared together with governments and partners in the region.
      The UN has been at the heart of all negotiation efforts and will continue to be until the crisis ends and, long after, until people’s livelihoods are restored. Our commitment to peace and human rights never ends and, despite criticism, we remain engaged in the most difficult places, serving people no matter how high the risks and how complex the circumstances. At the time I write, as you know, the UN is everywhere on the ground in Syria and the region, our colleagues diligently providing vital support and seeking solutions to growing problems. This is not a small contribution at a time of limited resources.
      As you rightly stated, it is important that we assist communities to stabilize through local, targeted interventions to help them deal with their immediate challenges and discourage any support to extremism and further destruction. To that end, recognizing the power of dialog, partnerships and strategic investment of all available resources for stability gains, we proposed three complementary and mutually reinforcing interventions on which we kindly invite you to provide thoughts and recommendations ahead of the forum. Let us be constructive and creative so that through supporting social and economic solutions we enable the environment for positive political dialog. This platform of consultations has the potential to generate and share very valuable knowledge and, therefore, we hope you remain engaged.

      • Melaku Geleta

        Dear Simona,

        Thank you for your summarized comments. In specific term, UNDP’s commitment in the region is as you truly said is commendable. That is very clear some of our staffs have committed their life too. Yet, the situation in the region is very volatile. Now what remained is an innovative solution, well organized and highly coordinated actions both at upstream and downstream level. I will keep suggest what i have in my mind in this line. Thank you again for valuable summary.
        Best
        Melaku Geleta
        UNDP Ethiopia

  • Yousef Baker

    The Syrian issue is not as simple as it looks: it is a very complicated and cannot be resolved in a meeting , resolution or recommendation nor a magic wand .It requires lots of measures to be taken internally and externally in particular.

    Internally : the country is now torn apart , the legitimate government is now in control of some parts of the country , other parts are controlled by other fractions : Sunnis , Druzes ( a monotheistic and Abrahamic religion based on the teachings of Plato, Aristotle, Socrates, Akhenaten, Hamza, and Al Hakim) Daesh (ISIS), Al Nosrah ( anti-government fraction) , Hizbuallah
    (pro-Iranian Lebanese resistance party). The population of Syria includes
    Muslems (Sunnis and Shiaat ) Christians and Jews .

    Externally: the country is under the influence of Iranian regime, Russia , and probably China as strategic allies pursuant to joint defense agreements and other treaties. On the other hand, some other influential countries such as USA , Saudi Arabia and Qatar and some other neighboring countries are not keen to see the future of Syria linked with the present ruler Bashar al Assad.

    In the light of the brief description of the situation in Syria above, this requires a (Package) of actions, meetings, solutions, resolutions, restrictions, agreements, waivers, concessions, tolerance, support, etc . by various parties to certain parties , but above all, this necessitates a rigorous Good Intention by all parties engaged.

    If the international community is serious in resolving the Syrian conflict, will it be ready to exercise a pressure on super powers to stop ISIS? In many occasions the US administration declared that ISIS does not constitute a threat to US security! What does this mean??? This is just an example on the actions, measures, etc.to be taken if the good intention is there. If not, then with consensus of the parties concerned.

    On the internal level,many actions are to be considered by the government at all levels, economic, health, education, sustainable development etc. to make the life of the citizens easier.

    By and large, the Syrian issue can not be isolated from the conflict in Iraq, the adjacent country, the Kurds issue, nor the Syrian- Israeli conflict, or the Arabic Spring wave which prevailed over some Arab countries in the region.

    What we are discussing now, inter alia, is how to cure the “symptoms and side effects” of the situation, which , in turn, turn to
    be “majors” such as the refugees dilemma ,the economy deterioration, the security and the future of the Palestinian refugees
    in the Syrian. etc.

    This will require a comprehensive strategic plan to be set out, agreed and strictly implemented, with a bundle of SMART objectives.
    Having said that , I would conclude that the mission is tough but is not impossible.

    • simona marinescu

      Dear Yousef Baker, the comprehensive strategic plan to help people and normalize the situation in the region you are referring to is precisely the proposed 3RP 2015-2016, which is the background document together with the three thematic papers for the upcoming Resilience Development Forum. While political aspects require all actors to continue engaging constructively in all forms of dialog and negotiations, people cannot wait any longer for their basic, vital needs to be met. Humanitarian support should be gradually transitioned into multi-partner investment in resilience and development, which will yield higher returns. Planning and funding strategic sectors including infrastructure, waste management, energy production, and services should consider business models that on one hand will involve public-private partnerships and on the other hand will integrate the poor and the displaced people who are in desperate need to make an income and provide for their families. There is considerable knowledge as to how to reverse the impact of crises into development opportunities and progress. The world has experienced wars and natural disasters with devastating effects and, through such “SMART objectives” as you called them, it eventually emerged stronger. We just need to connect the dots and bridge the knowledge and the funding to be able to stop the ordeal that millions of people experience in the region and beyond. I would encourage you to further elaborate on the SMART objectives you are thinking of. Let us exchange views during these remaining days before the forum and table some of these proposals for the leaders to analyze and decide. Looking forward to reading your ideas. Many thanks.

      • Yousef Baker

        Dear Simona Marinescu

        Many thanks for your informative and useful elaboration to my discussion. I had a quick look at the 3RP 2015-2016 which is professionally written and set out. I totally agree with you that Syrians cannot wait any longer to have their basic and vital needs met. They need immediate actions for immediate needs such as, food, food security ,cloth, shelter and medical care plus other humanitarian support.They also require supporting needs such as schooling, security, family life, integration with the host community, employment or sustainable sources of living etc. and finally they need entertainment and leisure such as sports etc. In parallel with all of that they need human rights, political guidance, equity and another comprehensive strategy so as to avoid the defects of the past and lay a concrete foundation for the future and for generations to come.

        In the light of the above, it is suggested that three categories of SMART objectives are drawn as follows:
        1- Immediate SMART objectives to be set out as an” Action Plan” to include but is not limited to the following Basic Needs :
        a- Provision of food.
        b- Appropriate shelter and cloths to meet the fluctuation of weather.
        c- Provision of medical and health care to avoid deterioration of the health of children and elderly people
        in particular and the rest of the refugees in general, with special attention to people with special needs (mentally or physically, etc.), this includes, sanitation and hygiene etc to avoid any communicable diseases.
        d- Other humanitarian support as required.
        2- Short term SMART objectives. These are necessary for survival in good shape and for providing
        the basics to think ahead for the future , such as :
        a- Provision of Education at all levels and streams.
        b- Vocational training
        c- Industrial Training.
        d- Capacity building
        e- Security measures, internally with the Syrian community and externally with the hosting community.
        f- Access to foreign languages courses.
        g- Employment; or finding a means for financial resources.
        h- Guidance on parenting, child care, family unity, and sustainability.
        i- Co-existence, locally and externally and how to integrate with the surrounding environment. and host community.
        j- Any other means, as the case may be, to boost the survival of the refugees, mitigate their sufferings
        and provide a ray of hope for the future.

        3- Long term SMART objectives: this will be in line with 3RP 2015-2016, provided that the objectives are
        limited with a time frame.

        It worth mentioning that one of the meanings of SMART is: specific, measurable, approved, realistic and time limited. In 3RP 2015-2016 -Turkey, the Plan is professionally designed and the KPIs. are clear but the SMARTness is a little bit vague in relation to the time limit in particular .

        It is therefore recommended to categorize the objectives into: 1) Immediate. 2) Short Term. and 3) Long Term, if applicable, with a strict SMARTness .

        One last point related to 3RP 2015-2016 above, is that there should be a periodical Evaluation measures to be carried out on the ground, to ensure that the Plan is duly performed. This again may require a Quality Assurance plan to monitor the 3RP 2015-2016.
        However, I hope that this explains what I meant by SMART objectives.

  • Melaku Geleta

    Aid Architecture for Resilience in the Syria Crisis

    Aid Architecture for Resilience in the Syria Crisis

    By: Melaku Geleta Wakjira

    Disaster Risk Managment & Livlihood
    Recovery Programme Coordinator

    United Nations Development Programme

    UNDP Ethiopia

    To me, the crisis in Syria & in the region in general has extended to the deep rooted & very complex nature. It seems very challenging for bringing the social, the political and the ideological interests of different actors to ease regional stress and brining a working solution. However, there are still some reaming hops and possibilities to end human suffering from the region. To indicate those possibilities in a very technical ways, I will try to summarize the following Aid Architectures for the intended Resilience bundling initiatives within the region.

    1. High-level regional security & resilience building policy advocacy:
    This must be a primary assignment to UN in general and UNDP in particular to facilitate, provide and deliver vibrant working solution to the people of Syria and the neighboring countries. Different interest groups, political & ideological blocks should come together & develop a regional advocacy agenda including a practical applications instruments. The advocacy program of the broader global initiative should contain the harmonization and normalization strategies towards consensus based solution provision to the region.

    2. Medium level and country specific policy advocacy on the importance of resilience building:
    At this level again local and regional institutions should work & strategize on how to promote global concerns regarding ongoing crisis, the high-level policy advocacy formwork towards ending human suffering and bringing peace and security in the region. The local institutions should take lead and they have to develop & promote new global slogan towards the regional crisis saying “enough is enough” for the region.
    3. High and grassroots level social, political and ideological affiliation harmonization, normalization and management:
    This is a critically important aspects of the aid architecture proposed to the region. The various groups participate in the process of affiliation management, normalization and harmonization of the aforementioned crisis needs to be on same page in order to arrive to the levels of “after regional crisis wound healing process”. The required strategy for having the intended aid effectiveness and delivery of SOP towards effective social, ideological and political affairs management must be part of the overall aid architecture.

    4. Syria & the surrounding regions protracted crisis resilience building funding:
    First the forum should come up with new protracted crisis resilience building definition. As I already mentioned on my former comment under subtitle of “Social Stability – Syrian Neighboring Countries “ , the crisis in this region is very unique by its nature , intensity and dynamicity. We cannot apply the conventional definition of resilience building we have been using for all crisis arises in the forms of natural disasters. Once we develop a new definition for this operation, then we need to consider the following funding modalities towards ending human suffering and sustaining decent life in the region.

    4:1. A rehabilitation and reconstruction fund for the destroyed infrastructures:
    The funding for this purpose primarily expected to be donated from all member countries who participate in a direct war of the region and support a proxy war happening in Syria and neighboring countries.

    4:2: Compensation fund for social and economic crisis & damages happening in Syria and in the region:
    This fund should be allocate from the above groups mentioned under 4:1. The fund will be used directly to support the people of the region who lost everything as a result of the protracted crisis.

    4:3: Rehabilitation, Recovery and Reconstruction fund:
    This is a fund that would be mobilize from all donors to enhance and revive the already destroyed livelihoods of the region until it return back to normal. In addition to activities to be done by host governments, all sectoral intervention are expected to be done through donors support for extended periods of time. This will pave a road towards livelihoods, psychosocial and economic recovery of the people.

    4.4: Provision of Loan and aid support to the host governments:
    This is a fund helps to the host governments to discharge all forms government responsibilities including psychosocial support, economic & political reforming, and public service provision.

    5. Security monitoring & cutting of all forms of military aid:
    This is very decisive parts of the formwork towards bringing peace and security & ending human suffering in the region. Any forms of military aid has to be banned until things back to normal status. This may take longer time. However, without this action the reaming modalities are not working. There should be a commitment and clear consensus on the importance of this part in order to ending the protracted crisis in the region. As we all know the geopolitical dynamics of the region is becoming very fragile for various reasons since the end of the cold war and falling of communism in the world. The end of a bipolar type political system is already has replaced by multipolar type political system. The power dynamics itself is becoming very illusive. As a result, this have actually brought another political dynamics towards the formations and developments of different forms of alliances. Today the world is divided in to different blocks seeking different alliances for different purposes, some needs alliance for military power for having upper hands in different blocks and parts of the world. Some are working to have alliance for strong economic mussel for development & global dominance. Some needs alliance for religious ideology promotion expansions & dominance, etc. The issues being discussing here is more far from the conventional strategies, understanding so far we have developed and using for conflict management and conflict resolutions.
    Hence, in addition to be very clear about the Goal of the global mission of the forum, it is also very important to have a very determinant position towards managing the security situation of the region and control associated military aid support
    dynamics which is still a root cause for the crisis the region. The forum needs to have vibrant security management and military aid monitoring instruments, established systems and compatible institutions within the aid effectiveness architecture recommended and prepared for Syria in particular & to the region in general.

  • CMI Marseille

    Congratulations on setting up this platform and for the comprehensive generic discussion papers provided. They are a stimulating and effective means to get the discussion going, including for us here at the Center for Mediterranean Integration in Marseille. The themes presented reflect key challenges for the Syrian Refugee Crisis international agenda.

    As you point out, it is essential to adopt an integrated resilience agenda that addresses the needs of refugees as well as hosts at all levels. We would also emphasize the need for long-term development policies and addressing mid- to long-term challenges, notably the mid-term creation of economic opportunities for refugee populations in host communities. Indeed, creating synergies between refugees and host communities highlights the fact that refugee influx can be an opportunity for hosts, and not simply a crisis to overcome.

    Building on this, we suggest three key elements that we would include on Resilience Agenda for the protracted crisis in Syria and the region, as well as beyond:

    1) Addressing the “lost generations” phenomenon amongst refugees, which consist of overwhelmingly young refugee populations undergoing a rapid erosion of human capital as they struggle to valorize their skills and professions in their host communities. Youth and youth opportunities based on economic and learning opportunities that emphasize the skills and knowledge of refugee populations are a priority ;

    2) Developing mid- and long-term strategies, notably the mid-term creation of economic opportunities for refugee populations in host communities ;

    3)Bridging the gap between humanitarian and development work to overcome these crises together, so as to work towards the creation of regional and global public goods.

    The CMI is a neutral convening space for partners to discuss how to move forward on resilience and development challenges: for instance, the focus of its high-level stakeholder conference “From Resilience to Development” discussed how to shift policies and financing mechanisms for hosting countries in the Mashreq at the CMI HQ in Marseille, on the 7th September 2015.

    Indeed, the CMI’s core mandate is intimately linked to the refugee question: we seek to work towards the creation of regional public goods in the Mediterranean through knowledge dissemination and convening activities on today’s most pressing agendas, including the refugee crisis, youth and economic opportunities, climate change and its effects (as seen during the 2006 drought in Syria that contributed to the current crisis), and violence and radicalization in the Mediterranean. To this end, we are working towards a regional knowledge-sharing and learning program on refugees with a variety of dedicated partners. It aims at identifying and disseminating best practices for host municipalities to work together with refugees in order to achieve the three points that we listed above.

    The UNDP’s upcoming Resilience Development Forum is an important step towards bringing the capacities of development partners together in a unified and concerted effort to address the Syrian refugee crisis. We commend your work and look forward to fruitful future collaborations!
    Greetings from Marseille!
    The Center for Mediterranean Integration

    • simona marinescu

      Dear CMI Colleagues, your opinions and suggestions are very important at this stage in the preparation of the key messages for the forum. We aim at enabling a dialog environment that will generate solutions and commitments. Funding consistency, transparency and efficiency are essential parameters to ensure every dollar is an investment in stability, integration, and cohesion, all prerequisites for resilience. Knowledge is a critical multiplier for progress in all areas. We welcome a partnership for bridging identified good practices with real solutions on the ground through suitable financing mechanisms. UNDP is building a global development solution exchange in which your programme can provide valuable inputs. We very much appreciate the opportunity of working together and suggest discussing ways for cooperation ahead of the forum. Standing ready for dialog in the coming days.

  • Atif Khurshid

    Dear colleagues,

    Thanks for providing this opportunity to contribute to this discussion.

    1. First of all i think we have to breakdown who’s resilience we want to build. Until we don’t know the audience we can’t come up with a comprehensive response, therefore we need to know the audience or the target beneficiaries – which are Syrian
    people and the environment, institution, consequences and the areas and communities they live in. So the focus should be on Syrian people and the environment and circumstances surrounding them – not the other way around – which needs a comprehensive resilience based approach for the humanitarian and development response. There is also an interplay of different variable (economic, social, political, governance, human rights, basic services) that are contributing to the lack of resilience among SYRIAN PEOPLE and we need to break it down in terms of what they are, how they interact in different circumstances (IDPs, hose communities, conflict area, neighboring countries, transit countries) and what kind of resilience based approach in needed in every context. Unless we don’t unpack it and understand it we will not be able to come up with a comprehensive resilience based approach to the crisis – we will be working in the peripheries doing firefight without actually addressing the factors that are contributing many Syrians to leave the country thus increasing burden on the neighboring countries/ host communities.

    2. Secondly, there are 7 million or more IDPs living in Syrian and around 4 million live outside Syrian in neighboring countries. So the focus should be the resilience building of 7 million IDPs living in safe areas in Syrian and host communities within Syria (those who are hosting these IDPs) by addressing socio-economic, local governance and environmental factors so that we avoid further migration of these IDPs to neighboring countries therefore reducing the future burden on the neighboring countries. I also think that in the Syrian context, we need to know more, therefore need for an assessment of what is happening on the ground in terms of displacement/ migration – driver/reasons, route, challenges within Syrian – are they moving from North (ISIL) to the safe places in and around Damascus or there is also South to North internal migration too (from regime controlled areas to ISIL controlled? – which I doubt but you never know because of religious and tribal affiliations), are Syrians also moving from safe places in and around Damascus to neighboring countries or they are primarily from conflict zones or mix? What is the development intersection of migration and displacement in the context of Syria and what can we do as development agency to improve the services in the safe areas in Syria and integration with host communities. What services/ issues are most pressing and causing people to move from safe places within Syria to elsewhere, is it education, health, security, optimism about future, WASH or combination of it? What is the breakdown, what are the nuances – is there a religious, sect and communal dimension to the migration as well? There are all questions that need to be known and understood for a comprehensive response to address safe migration, resilience building, addressing root causes of migration – I don’t know if anyone has done it before/ may be humanitarian agencies have done it. But if no one has done it we need to know for a comprehensive response.

    3. Thirdly, we need to work with the Syrian government/ state/ local institution for a comprehensive response to the Syrian
    humanitarian and development crisis. We are working but it needs to be scaled up and speedily. Without state intervention and institutional support UN agencies can’t provide support to 7 million IDPs living in Syria, and many more host communities living in Syria – almost everyone is impacted by the crisis. The approach of engaging local government, NGOs to address local issues are
    beneficial in the short run but will not be sustained without relying on state functionaries and comprehensive approach through the state functionaries. Therefore a political understanding with Syrian government for the neutrality of humanitarian and development work needs to be sorted out and a framework should be established (I don’t know if it exists or not)

    4. Fourth, for a comprehensive Syrian response to the crisis in Syrian, state institutions such as ministry of social welfare or any other ministry that is providing social protection services needs to be worked with to rely on state capacity in providing the basic services in the safe areas, areas controlled by the state. UN system can contribute with better targeting, vulnerability assessment and technical support in designing programmes that could benefit the IDPs, host communities and focusing on social cohesion, livelihood, WASH health and education and other service needs.

    Resilience building in host communities/ neighboring countries

    1. I think the major issues is the integration and legal rights of refugees/ displaced people in the neighboring host countries. Turkey has allowed Syrian refugees to work and it would be good to see how the migrant workers are contributing to the local economy in Turkey. We should frame the discussions around refugees and their positive contribution to the local economic activity, multiculturalism, remittances, innovation and etc. May be UNDP can conduct a study on this?

    2. Secondly, I think another aspect is that in Syria and Jordan and Lebanon – there are tribal connection/ often people belonging to same tribe live across the boundaries – which could be looked and worked on in terms of integration and social cohesion.

    3. We need to strongly engage League of Arab Nations to build and enhance Arab solidarity in addressing refugee crisis, advocating for allowing rights to work, and addressing gender based violence and sex trafficking/ exploitation.

    4. Women and children are the most disproportionately impacted both in terms of exploitation in the refugee centers, sexual violence and exploitation etc. Protective measure, in addition to strong advocacy is therefore needed for the refugees to live a life
    with dignity in wherever they are.

    5. Zakat – Islamic religious mandatory (fifth pillar of Islam) contribution (a form of social protection system) for the rich to redistribute 2.5% of their income to poor and most vulnerable people. I think there is a need for strong advocacy to efficiency
    and effective use of this money and linking it with the current Syria and Iraq crisis. I had a discussion with UNICEF colleagues to do a paper on this.

    Resilience of transit countries/ routes:

    1. Safe migration: promoting safe migration through Turkey (around more than 2k people died during their journey to Europe). May be trying to find innovative ways to encourage safe migration and obviosuly, addressing root causes of why people are migrating.

    Hope you find it usefull!

    Atif Khurshid

    • simona marinescu

      Dear Atif Kurshid, many thanks for the thorough analysis of the situation in the region and the suggested approaches. Indeed, UNDP explores all avenues that may lead to accelerated progress, supporting governments to implement national resilience plans and mitigate the impact of the crisis in all its forms. Labour permits for displaced people to be able to formally access jobs as well as the engagement of the private sector in the provision of basic services in host communities and in employment generation have been discussed at length. No solution can work alone. Needs are growing whereas institutional capacities and resources are limited. The 3RP Plan 2015-2016 consists of a comprehensive set of actions to reverse the rapid decline in the quality of life in host communities and provide solutions for all people affected by the expanding instability in the region and beyond. What we aim to build through constant dialog is commitment of all actors – state, non-state national actors, and international organizations – is commitment, coherence of action and optimal use of resources. Funding is important both in size and in the combination of sources. The latter is as important as the former. There has been massive investment in the humanitarian response as well as in ongoing development interventions to scale up the supply of services, but the results are modest. What we propose in the aid architecture paper is the optimization of all funding mechanisms to ensure public and private financing as well as aid support stability and act in full complementarity towards the objectives of the national resilience plans. A financial compact if you wish that is meant to secure coherence, transparency and effectiveness. UNDP has great experience in building multi-partner financing mechanisms to provide resources for sector budget support as well as in debt-to-development swaps to reduce indebtedness and build productive capacities. All these countries including Syria have borrowed a lot in recent years, their solvability in the short and medium term being highly uncertain. Their labor markets will not expand unless public and private investment grows, but due to high recurrent costs, capital budgets are shrinking and opportunities for public private partnerships (PPP) are running thin. Because of that, what we are advocating for is a multi-stakeholder agreement for funding from all sources to be directed to the resilience agenda. If private investment is channeled to bordering industrial zones, more jobs will be created for both local and displaced people and positive externalities will help communities on both sides of the border to have access to better services, goods and jobs. Public investment can leverage private financing and aid, but that requires a strategic approach to funding resilience, which we want to discuss with the world in the upcoming forum and further develop. Remittances can help stabilization efforts in Syria, but such an endeavor requires that money coming in support consumption and increase savings. Development or diaspora bonds guaranteed by the donor community can be a great source of funding for large infrastructure building and energy production. The question we are trying to address, for which your opinions are highly valuable, is what type of funding make-up can act as a multiplier for stability and resilience. We thank you very much and look forward to our continuing dialog on this page.

  • simona marinescu

    Dear Atif Kurshid, many thanks for the thorough analysis of the situation in the region and the suggested approaches. Indeed, UNDP explores all avenues that may lead to accelerated progress, supporting governments to implement national resilience plans and mitigate the impact of the crisis in all its forms. Labour permits for displaced people to be able to formally access jobs as well as the engagement of the private sector in the provision of basic services in host communities and in employment generation have been discussed at length. No solution can work alone. Needs are growing whereas institutional capacities and resources are limited. The 3RP Plan 2015-2016 consists of a comprehensive set of actions to reverse the rapid decline in the quality of life in host communities and provide solutions for all people affected by the expanding instability in the region and beyond. What we aim to build through constant dialog is commitment of all actors – state, non-state national actors, and international organizations – is commitment, coherence of action and optimal use of resources. Funding is important both in size and in the combination of sources. The latter is as important as the former. There has been massive investment in the humanitarian response as well as in ongoing development interventions to scale up the supply of services, but the results are modest. What we propose in the aid architecture paper is the optimization of all funding mechanisms to ensure public and private financing as well as aid support stability and act in full complementarity towards the objectives of the national resilience plans. A financial compact if you wish that is meant to secure coherence, transparency and effectiveness. UNDP has great experience in building multi-partner financing mechanisms to provide resources for sector budget support as well as in debt-to-development swaps to reduce indebtedness and build productive capacities. All these countries including Syria have borrowed a lot in recent years, their solvability in the short and medium term being highly uncertain. Their labor markets will not expand unless public and private investment grows, but due to high recurrent costs, capital budgets are shrinking and opportunities for public private partnerships (PPP) are running thin. Because of that, what we are advocating for is a multi-stakeholder agreement for funding from all sources to be directed to the resilience agenda. If private investment is channeled to bordering industrial zones, more jobs will be created for both local and displaced people and positive externalities will help communities on both sides of the border to have access to better services, goods and jobs. Public investment can leverage private financing and aid, but that requires a strategic approach to funding resilience, which we want to discuss with the world in the upcoming forum and further develop. Remittances can help stabilization efforts in Syria, but such an endeavor requires that money coming in support consumption and increase savings. Development or diaspora bonds guaranteed by the donor community can be a great source of funding for large infrastructure building and energy production. The question we are trying to address, for which your opinions are highly valuable, is what type of funding make-up can act as a multiplier for stability and resilience. We thank you very much and look forward to our continuing dialog on this page.

  • Marcos Athias Neto

    Hi everyone,

    As one of the moderators for this online discussion, I’d like to thank everyone for these excellent contributions to this online discussion. The richness of this discussion does reflect the complex dimensions of this crisis and the need to look for holistic and locally led solutions integrating multiple stakeholders in the response. It is great to hear about inspiring examples how you are already working on these issues.

    I agree with the points raised in the discussion that the unique features of this crisis, the needs of the vulnerable populations and the issues in different contexts need to be fully understood to be able to design sustainable and effective support systems and development plans and projects. UNDP works with host governments, local institutions and other relevant stakeholders in the affected countries to ensure a long term resilience approach, bridging the humanitarian crisis support to long term resilience and recovery work. This also allows us to not only think of the short term crisis response but the medium and long term plans. While the priority needs to be in ending the conflict, supporting the people struggling due to the conflict is also important.

    As also brought up in the discussion, we need to quickly scale up the support. The Resilience Development Forum is organized to advocate globally for scaled up support and it is calling for the governments, UN agencies, international financial institutions, donors, non-governmental organisations and the private sector to come together to shape the agenda and seek collective recommendations, solutions and partnerships for this crisis. But this is just a starting point, further detailed actions will be designed and implemented at the country level.

    Let me also touch upon specific private sector related issues mentioned in the discussions:

    1. Concrete strategies for private sector development and engagement, based on studies and data are needed

    The recommendation for UNDP’s support to providing accurate data and reliable studies about the issues (including e.g. local economy, livelihoods, impact on the host communities, remittances, vulnerability, impact on gender equality and human trafficking) are well received. Accurate data and analysis of the background forms a basis for proper planning and strategy development exercise.

    2. Skills development, human capital and education

    Skills development of the vulnerable populations was also one of the recommendations in the Generic Discussion Paper. Education as an important factor for resilience and promoting stability and peace. This should indeed cover both the host communities and the displaced people. In our discussion paper, we proposed to use demand-driven approach to skills development, where private sector is an active partner in designing and implementing apprenticeships, on the job training schemes and other skills development initiatives. This approach is based on UNDP’s experience in such models in various countries.

    3. Economic recovery, livelihoods and jobs

    Many of the comments touched upon the issue of economic recovery and support to building livelihoods and jobs for both displaced people but also the host communities. In the generic discussion paper, we had proposed procurement leveraging and local sourcing, especially from micro, small and medium sized companies, as one possible opportunity to support livelihoods and job creation. Support systems and incentives for creating and scaling up for inclusive business models and value chains should also be encouraged. Special Economic Zones are another potentially effective tool through which governments, through special tax and other incentives, could catalyze, shape and drive foreign private investments (including Syrian investments) in areas where growth and employment prospects have been challenged by the spillovers of the Syrian crisis and where these investments may be discouraged by perceptions (whether real or not) of socio-economic instability.

    4. Basic goods and services

    Providing basic goods and services for displaced people and the host communities could benefit from Public – Private Partnerships offer critical opportunities to close public funding and capacity gaps by collaborating with the private sector to deliver well maintained, cost effective public infrastructure or services. National resilience and stabilization plans and other response frameworks across neighboring countries inherently provide a broad range of opportunities for such partnerships to improve delivery key areas such as affordable, efficient and clean energy supply, water, solid waste management, transport, affordable and decent housing, scaling-up of education/vocational training and health provision.

    5. Technological and innovative solutions

    Many comments also referred to the need for technological and innovative solutions for different development challenges. Private sector and foundations have a lot to offer in this field. CSR-based initiatives are already part of the humanitarian response and have provided various opportunities for the private sector to make use of its core business skills and even testing new technologies.

    6. Funds and financing arrangements

    In the discussion the need for different kinds of funds, e.g. for infrastructure, rehabilitation and reconstruction, livelihoods and economic recovery was brought up. In addition to traditional financing mechanism, we should not forget the potential of private sector and philanthropic foundations resources. Innovative partnerships and financing arrangements such as ‘blended finance’ could also be used by public investors (DFIs/IFIs, philanthropic institutions..) to mitigate risks or increase investment returns for private investors and build capacity to attract greater private capital in high impact resilience building initiatives. Public investors’ contributions may take the form of direct funding (i.e. through grants, loans at favorable terms, equity investments) that can have a ‘subsidy effect’ on private investments, including in the SME sector. These may also involve providing specific risk-mitigating products (e.g. through guarantees, political risk insurance) that can help address credit, contractual, political and other uncertainties associated with private investment projects. Public investors can also contribute technical assistance to identify and demonstrate opportunities for socially and environmentally impactful projects. However, blended finance arrangements need to be carefully planned and implemented.

    I’m looking forward to hearing more views on the key elements that should be featured in this agenda and what actions you are planning to contribute. In addition, I’m looking forward to hearing about any experiences, lessons learned and exciting models for building resilience in crisis situations, especially related to the private sector. I’m looking forward to a continued discussion in the coming week which will help in shaping the discussions into concrete actions that can advance resilience in the region.

    Best,

    Marcos Neto,

    Director of UNDP’s Istanbul International Center for Private Sector in Development

  • Mohammed Eid

    Thank you for providing such opportunity, I’m Mohammed Eid and I work for the UNRWA, Gaza strip as relief officer and refugee assistant
    Talking about resilience agenda, I would immediately compare the Syrian situation with the most protracted crises of – the Palestine case- I believe that maslow hierarchy of needs should be taken into consideration when designing any resilience agenda. Human beings in nature tend to seek psychological needs first and safety, then social needs, esteem and self actualization. Talking of the UNRWA experience, the agency has started distributing small tents and now it has the largest school system in the Middle East and some graduate colleges (in Jordan). I believe that the agenda should include, first, urgent mobilization to provide critical needs that in case being lack, civilian lives will be put on danger, cooperation with neighbour countries should be considered and local investment and employment as well. Second, the development should be aimed at radical rebuilding of the affected society targeting educaion, health services and relief efforts. following that, snowball effect should take place as services should begin extending as well as fund raising efforts and investments to achieve sustainable aid for affected areas.
    That’s generally speaking, and in details lies the devil.

  • Djokam Poka Marius

    The solution to the Syrian issue can go through a strategic plan for resilience. It can be divided into 03 points:

    – Political dialogue:

    In the political dialogue, the different political actors should stand together in the same table of discussion with all
    countries involved in the reconstruction of the Syrian government ( Russia,Iran, Saudi-Arabia, the United States, France …). In order to achieve a common agenda that will lead to a definitive cease-fire between the different political actors to join forces against Daesh. These countries must find funds that will finance the Syrian economy through the setting on a bank for small
    and medium local business. The bank will finance youth projects in different economic sectors.

    – Forums on peace, religion and development

    In this forum, the Syrians will senbilize on issues of “living together” in irrespective of religious and political affiliation. This forum will result in a truth and reconciliation conference and all internal and external actors must participate to reach a social pact. The dialogue on peace and the construction of a religious identity must be continuous throughout the process. This dialogue aims to raise awareness of the Syrian population regularly on issues of peace, democracy and good governance.

    – Leadership program of syrian youth

    The training program in leadership and good governance will prepare a new potential carrier generation. That generation will able to make Syria a developed country.

    Thank you.

  • tala khrais

    With reference to the question raised by the moderator on an “inclusive resilience model “that will include all segments of the Syrian society. I believe that LED approach is the best approach to achieve this inclusive model . It is based on institutional and social dialogue to achieve a shared vision and stimulate inclusive economic development opportunities through enhanced linkages between local socio-economic actors. Improving the management of local resources including the natural resources will play a vital role in improving the local economy and prevent the same conflict reappearing again. The cooperation among different actors is expected to reduce unemployment and provide economic opportunities thus contributing to social stability.
    The voice of local actors /mainly farmers or their representing national organization/ must be heard and they must comprehend that they have a common interest in promoting economic development for their territory and that this can benefit the local communities, widening opportunities for life with dignity,this could be at the same time a strategy for preventing conflict and promoting social dialogue and social reconciliation.
    LED approach is expected to give voice to all local actors,helping to narrow down the “representational gap”. The participatory nature of LED encourages the inclusion socially excluded groups in decision making processes.Empowering all social actors especially those who are more vulnerable and excluded. For example,individuals with disabilities must be included. According to world vision organization recent report , around 1 million are permanently disabled.
    Raising awareness of environmental issues among stakeholders at the beginning of the recovery process is expected to pave the
    way for their integration into the design and implementation of a bottom up LED strategy. The economic development must occur in harmony with environmental sustainability. In such a way LED is expected to reduce the risk factor of conflict relapsing.

    • simona marinescu

      Dear Tala Khrais, many thanks for bringing up an important initiative of UNDP which is the Local Economic Development programme aimed at strengthening local economic planning, budgeting and programme management capacities involving social dialog and broad participation. Regional LEDA in Lebanon and LED Jordan have delivered great results. The approach itself is at the center of the resilience building agenda of UNDP as by empowering people and communities we establish the foundation of cohesive and inclusive development. In the pursuit of the Sustainable Development Goals, building economies and societies from below will ensure we leave no one behind, a critical objective of the Agenda 2030. LED works well in relatively stable socio-economic context and parameters, but we would like to see to what extent such a strong local partnership model contributes to resilience and irreversible transformations even in times of fragility and vulnerability. Thank you for flagging LED and its role in building communities and markets. Definitely a topic for the upcoming forum agenda.

      • tala khrais

        Dear Simona, thank you for your valuable comment and explanation about UNDP’s “LED initiative” as an approach in post conflict situations. Furthermore, I believe that we can further benefit from the experience of countries that followed this approach in post conflict situations such as Colombia. The Colombian case for local economic recovery for employment opportunities and integration in post-conflict situations is worth to be investigated and examined. During the recent 3rd LED forum in Turino , a workshop was conducted on ” Local economic development as a strategy for peacebulding and conflict transformation” . This valuable experience of Colombia in “Peace-Making and Power Sharing” was presented by the National Network of Local Development Agencies of Colombia (www.redadelco.org) and ILO /Crisis Department.

        • simona marinescu

          Thank you, Tala. Excellent idea! We will definitely support a South-South Cooperation exchange with Colombia for the countries affected by the crisis. Knowledge and solutions that have already been tested in various similar environments are priceless. Great suggestion for our dedicated sessions in the forum!

  • Elie Kodsi

    Thank you for organizing this online discussion. To identify the three key elements of a Resilience Agenda, it would be helpful to refer to the most commonly used definition of Resilience, i.e. the ability of people, communities and ecologies to cope with and recover from shocks and stresses. The resilience agenda should therefore focus:

    – Alleviating shocks
    – Managing stresses
    – Enhancing ability of people, communities, and ecosystems to cope and recover

    In the context of the Syrian crisis:

    Alleviating shocks- means primarily addressing the violent conflict. This entails first and foremost understanding and mediating the
    strategic political and economic conflicting interests in the Region, which are at the base of the conflict in order to create an enabling environment for a resilience building agenda to unfold.

    Managing stresses – These include the socio-economic stresses resulting from the conflict as well the environmental stresses caused by drought and the effects of climate change.

    Enhancing ability to cope – Here it is important to note that resilience manifests at several levels: individual, household, community,
    nations, ecosystems. Interventions need to target the main building blocks of resilience which include the natural capital, the socio-economy, the institutions, and livelihood assets. It is also important to differentiate between household resilience and community
    resilience. The latter is determined by community capacity for collective action as well as its ability for problem solving and consensus building to negotiate coordinated response. This depends very much on its social capital, institutions and networks in society which are particularly important for resilient development

    The Nairobi Global Policy Centre (Resilient Livelihoods and Ecosystems Centre) is one of six UNDP Global Policy Centres, responsible for advancing global thinking and knowledge sharing on inclusive resilient development in drylands and other fragile
    ecosystems. The Centre’s domain of competence lies in the areas of resilient livelihoods and ecosystems. It promotes intellectual exchange, develops tools and methodologies and facilitates the global dissemination of optimal policies and good practices for enhancing livelihoods and fostering socio-ecological resilience in fragile ecosystems. Through its Integrated Drylands Development
    Programme, the Centre has been supporting the implementation of the Response Plans to the crisis in Syria and neighboring ountries. In Lebanon, it is channeling its support within the framework of the Lebanon Host Communities Support project, enhancing livelihoods of affected communities. In Jordan, it is providing catalytic support for the formulation of priority projects within
    the framework of the Jordan Response Plan. In Syria, it is supporting interventions under the Early Recovery and Livelihoods Sector, restoring disrupted livelihoods through the creation of income generating activities for vulnerable groups with special attention to women-headed households.

    The Regional Refugee and Resilience Plan (3RP) is currently underfunded (23% of the funding appeal). This underfunding means that longer-term interventions to help build the resilience of host countries to manage the pressures of the crisis are being delayed or cancelled, with the impact of reversing development gains. In this context, the Centre is ready to provide technical assistance and help mobilize partners and resources to advance the resilience-based approach advocated for under 3RP.

    Elie Kodsi, Senior Technical Advisor, Resilient Livelihoods and Ecosystems Centre
    Mona Haidar, Programme Specialist, Resilient Livelihoods and Ecosystems Centre

  • simona marinescu

    Dear RDF friends, comments and ideas you continue to share with us are highly important to the UNDP team preparing the forum.
    Please use the remainder of the week for final suggestions to be considered in the high-level debates that will be joined by governments, civil society, private sector, donors and development partners, and UN representatives.
    We would like to summarize your great proposals for the messaging around the event.
    We also count on your active tweeting on the topic of resilience so that we all come as one community, in full solidarity to support the resilience agenda for the Syrian displaced people and their host communities.
    All voices will be heard, all ideas will be tabled, all potential solutions will be explored.
    We thank you very much indeed for your participation in this online discussion and await additional inputs. Let’s optimally use the time left. Share with us the wealth of knowledge and experience you all have. You are making a significant contribution to the RDF deliberations. UNDP stands ready to adopt ideas that can change people’s lives.

  • Migration for Development

    Hello everyone, I am Joanne Irvine, writing on behalf of the Joint Migration and Development Initiative of the United Nations Development Programme:

    What are the three key elements that should be in a Resilience Agenda, according to you or your organization?

    1. Multi-level (local-national) approach with a focus on supporting and enhancing the capacities of local, regional and
    national authorities and other local actors to put local mechanisms and processes in place that are in line with national for more coherent and effective actions. Such mechanisms would aim to expand local authorities’ municipal and social services and support job creation at the local level as outlined in points 2 and 3 below. All of which can tackle social inclusion and promote socio-economic development and support mitigation of the lack of trust in authorities in general, which is particularly effective at the local level given local authorities’ proximity to their constituencies. These mechanisms also need to ensure the full participation of local authorities and other local actors in the dialogue, design and implementation of such an approach since they hold key information and understanding of the real needs of their local populations. This will allow such mechanisms to respond effectively and in a tailored manner to the specific and differing contexts that occur even within any one country or region. This also ensures that local and regional authorities are fully committed to and take ownership over such initiatives at the local level.

    2. Go from a Do-No-Harm approach which tackles immediate symptoms to a long-term rights-based development approach at the local level that ensures equal access to services, education etc. for all to ensure inclusive growth and local development for the whole community in line with the Global Human Development Report of 2014 ‘Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience’ whereby resilience is acknowledged to require a systemic approach to universal access to public services, social protection, employment etc. To achieve this, it is necessary to close the divide between humanitarian and development initiatives and funding channels given that this remains fragmented. Moreover, in order to ensure a systematic approach to universal access to public services, social protection, employment etc.: efforts should be made to mainstream migration into national and local policy planning for more institutionalized responses that can support sustained resilience efforts in the face of continued human mobility.

    To further support growth and development efforts, outreach and engagement with diaspora for their support, skills transfer, FDI and remittances is essential. Remittances or diaspora-led FDI can also provide additional financial resources where ODA, FDI and national investment fall short. Particularly with remittances and investment, there is a need to ensure that these are channelled into productive uses that benefit the whole community, not only the migrant community.

    3. Multi-stakeholder participatory approach that includes communities and migrant communities themselves (together with authorities, NGOs and international organisations) to: (i) ease social tensions, raise awareness and promote cultural diversity and avoid exclusion of individuals or groups becoming violent or in order to express their grievances or have their voice heard; (ii) empower communities to take ownership and an active role in their own resilience and development process; (iii) ensure support provided is adequate by linking up to those with insight and profound knowledge of the processes, people and structures at the local level; (iv) build on south-south and triangular cooperation dynamics to allow territories with common migratory channels to manage migration flows from both the sending and destination territories, particularly looking to absorb displaced labour and ensure productivity and entrepreneurship, as well as productive use of remittances.

    Based on your response to question one, what actions will you, your organisation or your government take to contribute to the Resilience Agenda?

    The Joint Migration and Development Initiative (JMDI) is a global inter-agency programme led by UNDP in collaboration with IOM, ITC-ILO, UNHCR, UNITAR, UNFPA and UN Women and is funded by the European Commission and the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation. The JMDI aims to maximize the potential of migration for local development through the delivery of targeted support to local authorities and non-state actors by:

    – Increasing the development impact of M&D initiatives of local authorities in partnership with civil society organizations up-scaling existing locally led initiatives with financial and technical assistance. The JMDI therefore supports 16 projects led by local authorities in eight target countries: Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Morocco, Nepal, Philippines, Senegal and Tunisia.

    – Connecting local authorities to each other and with other local stakeholders to facilitate dialogue and partnership through our online M4D Net platform http://www.migration4development.org where members can interact, learn, and network with other migration and development practitioners and get involved in our online discussions and consultations.

    Reinforcing the capacities of local administrations through constant coaching and capacity building, creation of knowledge tools such as the JMDI Toolbox and promoting partnerships for peer-to-peer support and knowledge exchange.

    Linking local authorities and other local actors to national and international dialogue on migration and development through such events as the Global Forum on Migration and Development, the High Level Dialogues on Migration and Development and more.

    Based on our response to question one, the JMDI can contribute to the Resilience Agenda by:

    1. Directly supporting local authorities or other local actors on specific queries through our online Support Unit where we have a roster of migration and development experts on hand to respond;

    2. Supporting local and regional authorities to mainstream migration into local policy planning by sharing the “My JMDI Toolbox” which is a set of training materials on how to manage migration at the local level for local development, promoting its use and looking into how to adapt it to the specific context of any territory or country if needed.

    3. Where possible, the JMDI could also provide direct Capacity Building sessions on site based on the JMDI
    Toolbox and the collective expertise we have gained through our inter-agency approach.

    4. Of further interest could be the newly published JMDI-IOM White Paper on ‘Mainstreaming
    Migration into Local Development Planning and Beyond’ which aims to provide a thorough analysis of what has been done thus far in terms of mainstreaming migration at the local level and allows for a stock-taking of functioning practices to paint a global picture of working processes, lessons learned and policy recommendations for future mainstreaming exercise;

    5. Engaging our community of practitioners (over 4,000 members), international experts and pertinent actors engaged in the resilience agenda in online e-discussions or live chats to further knowledge and exchange of ideas around building resilience in territories;

    6. Support the promotion of the local dimension of migration, development and resilience building at the national and international level within such spaces as the Global Forum on Migration and Development and the Mayoral Fora on Mobility, Migration and Development.

  • Patrick Mc Namara

    As a starting point, I hope the resilience development forum generates a shared sense of purpose, a common intent and longer term vision for building resilience in the region. HOW the international community, governments and the UN system work together will need to change in order to truly build resilience. By focusing our efforts on working in new ways, addressing the complex regional crisis adaptively (e.g. Adaptive Leadership model from Harvard), and following principles of resilience, results will be generated more quickly and will spread across the region and beyond. Specific actions could include:

    ·Identify entry-points, pilots and area-based resilience activities where SUCCESSFUL SOLUTIONS are already EMERGING; capture and share learnings (from quick wins and failures) so efforts are adapted to support increased success in the long-term. This may include new ways of doing things; shifts in values, norms and attitudes; as well as empowering local solutions that are lower risk because they focus efforts where change is needed (e.g. employment permits in high-vulnerability areas). These local
    solutions could be a key to future systemic shifts and collective learning. By focusing on small pilots and learning from their impact, we can build resilience in pockets, learn from that, and expand successes with the intention of a systemic shift in resilience regionally.

    · Continue the country-level MULTI-STAKEHOLDER DIALOGUES on building resilience because the complex crisis requires all stakeholders to be engaged in addressing the real issues and GENERATE SOLUTIONS TOGETHER that work. These dialogues and the informal spaces they create will increase trust among stakeholders, promote information and knowledge sharing, and create conditions for resilience to emerge.

    · Measure progress and build capacity to operate in a CULTURE OF RESILIENCE that includes: embracing uncertainly, taking calculated risks, fostering emergent solutions, engaging in adaptive leadership, learning from quick wins/losses and adapt to build deeper, longer-term wins. In short, a culture of resilience challenges us to work collaboratively, authentically, and effectively in order to create conditions for resilience at the team, agency, organisational and regional levels.

    The solutions we create will need to be more integrated, that collaboration and knowledge sharing is essential, and that resilience may first need to be built in smaller ways before it expands to the whole region.

    
To do this the actors need to MOVE FROM COORDINATION TO COLLABORATION by engaging all stakeholders, mapping the values and interests of each stakeholder, articulating common ground, committing to robust engagement, and ensuring clarity of roles and accountability. This will require difficult work to move through differences in order to BUILD TRUST and transform conflict into productive engagement. This new way of working “beyond business as usual” will both be challenging and at the same time more rewarding as we together learn to more effectively address the complex regional crisis.

  • Randa Wilkinson

    Thank you all for such a rich discussion. The complexity and magnitude of the situation requires us to step outside our usual expert roles. It is great to hear that the focus has shifted to looking at and learning from local solutions. By listening to the many different stakeholders within communities who are the real experts, we can learn what solutions are already working and leverage those to create sustainable change.

  • simona marinescu

    Dear online contributors,
    I take from all the exchanges that CONFIDENCE as a dialog enabler and a uniting factor in all communities and societies remains key to resilience. Confidence building is at the core of our resilience agenda. Confidence leads to solidarity and to the commitment to “Staying Strong Together”, which has become the motto of our 3RP proposal. Looking forward to more exchanges in the limited time left before the forum opens its doors.

  • Kishan Khoday

    Dear Colleagues,

    Great discussion! One issue I wanted to add in is the importance of energy access for the poor and displaced in the region, and it has strong relevance for the three topics in this discussion – resilient livelihoods, role of the private sector and aid architecture.

    Today the vast majority of refugees and IDPs in the region are hosted in countries like Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and Syria that also face energy insecurity challenges. With the vast majority of Syrian refugees in neighboring host countries living in cities and towns, host communities have experiences a surge of incremental energy demand in recent years. This has exacerbated already strained energy infrastructure and created new fiscal pressures as energy supply costs rise. Challenges are exacerbated by ongoing conflict and destruction of energy infrastructure in Syria and Iraq, and lack of fiscal space and constrained ability to expand energy supplies, as in Lebanon and Jordan.

    A lack of access to energy has created dire social challenges for daily life and the ability of host communities and refugees and IDPs to recover from crisis. Expanding access to sustainable energy solutions can bring important health benefits from reduced use of fossil fuels like diesel and charcoal in dwellings, improved education through enhanced lighting for reading, less need for women and children to seek out energy provision and thus reduced security risks, less cases of unregulated or illegal felling of wood from forests, and cash savings from reduced energy costs which can be reallocated to a host of other basic development needs by host communities and refugees alike.

    Expanding use of sustainable energy solutions can also help relieve fiscal pressures faced by host countries. In Jordan for example, rising local energy demands owing to the refugee influx has been a significant factor in growing energy import costs in recent years; a major element of the growing national deficit. Increasing access to solar power can thus be an important offset to rising energy imports, freeing up fiscal space and domestic resources for other recovery and development priorities.

    Expanding access to sustainable energy solutions in host countries can therefore bring important economic, social and environmental triple-wins. Distributed solar energy solutions are expanding in scope in the market globally and in the region and are an increasingly cost-effective alternative to conventional and costly solutions like diesel used today by many host communities to meet incremental energy demands from refugees and IDPs. Decentralized, off-grid technologies are now an effective solution through options like solar PV, solar water heaters, hybrid solar-diesel and/or solar-wind power sets, and biomass/biogas waste-to-energy generators.

    An important opportunity exists to integrate sustainable energy solutions into crisis response and recovery initiatives under the nationally-led plans and projects affiliated to emerge under the 3RP. In Jordan, for example, through technical assistance from UNDPs Regional Hub for Arab States and UNOPS to the Government, a dedicated chapter on sustainable energy was integrated into the 2015 Jordan Response Plan (JRP) with over $100 million of proposed initiatives on solar energy and energy efficiency for refugee host communities. Sustainable energy solutions are also now being reflected into the next JRP edition for 2016-2018. In Lebanon too UNDP has been working closely with national government and local communities to expand use of clean energy heating stoves and solar panels for street lighting and household needs, already reaching large numbers of households and refugee host communities.

    But much more needs to be done to scale-up and expand results for benefit of refugees and IDPs across the region. This includes the global expertise and experiences of the UN Development System, leaders on the sustainable energy agenda like the Canada, the EC, Germany, Japan and the UK, as well as leading sources of innovation and finance from the private sector. Arab Gulf partners are also vital; among the largest providers of humanitarian and development assistance globally while also emerging leaders in sustainable energy. Partners like the UAE Ministry of International Cooperation and Development, the OPEC Fund for International Development (OFID), the Islamic Development Bank (IsDB), the Saudi Fund for Development and the Kuwait Fund for Development, have provided energy access support to countries around the world for many years.

    Gearing sustainable energy experiences and resources from global and regional partners to the plight of refugees and IDPs within the region can help bridge humanitarian and development concerns. Mainstreaming sustainable energy solutions into crisis response and recovery frameworks is an issue in need of greater emphasis, with significant economic, social and environment co-benefits, and of great immediate and long-term benefit to those displaced by conflict in the region.

    Regards,
    Kishan

    Kishan Khoday
    UNDP Team Leader in the Arab Region
    Climate Change & Sustainable Energy
    Disaster Risk Reduction & Recovery

  • Peter Doyle

    Dear all, please see some contributions from Concern Worldwide.

    What are the three key elements that should be in
    a Resilience Agenda, according to you or your organization?

    1. Refugees must be able to access livelihoods and educational opportunities. Given current restrictions, many refugees are
    solely dependent on the humanitarian assistance they receive. However, the protracted nature of the crisis and the growing needs have resulted in serious cuts to that assistance. Allowing access to livelihoods/employment opportunities would not only contribute to the host country’s economy but would also allow for refugees to be less dependent on assistance. Gender is a key influence on how people experience conflict. Understanding gender roles, responsibilities and disparities is necessary in order to shape policies which are appropriate and adequate to the needs of all. Additionally, many Syrian children have been out of school since the start of the conflict, the effects of which are detrimental to a child’s development, putting their futures in jeopardy. They are also the people who will have to rebuild Syria in the future.

    2. Efforts to support the capacities of local institutions in host countries must be maintained or increased. The large influx of refugees has stretched local institutions to their breaking points. To prevent destabilisation, donors should fund projects that strengthen local institutions and that also benefit both host communities and refugee populations. Additionally, humanitarian and development/stabilisation funding should not be viewed as a continuum, but rather should be happening in tandem. Financial commitments made must be delivered upon. There are too many unmet pledges, which undermine the efforts of all actors seeking to respond to the needs and fulfil the rights of those impacted most severely.

    3. Conflict prevention, mitigation, and resolution must be a much higher priority. A peaceful, political solution is an essential first step to resolve this crisis. However even if an agreement is reached, peace and stability won’t materialise in Syria overnight. Beyond investing in the reconstruction of Syrian infrastructure, significant effort will need to be put into conflict resolution at all levels, from the community level to the political level, and must happen simultaneously. Additionally, much work will need to be done to allow for the safe return of IDPs and refugees, including demining, vector control, and rehabilitation of water and sanitation infrastructure. The particular vulnerabilities of refugees based on their gender must be fully considered. The development of projects and policies must take full account of these. Protection against sexual and gender based violence should be a key consideration for all programmes. They must also ensure that the voices of woman are included and their voices are heard and used to shape decisions.

    Based on your response to question one, what actions will you, your organisation or your government take to contribute to
    the Resilience Agenda?

    1. Refugees must be able to access livelihoods and educational opportunities. Concern continues to support Syrian refugees in
    Lebanon through activities designed to bridge children’s re-entry into the formal Lebanese education system. Over 4,400 children (both Syrian and Lebanese) participated in basic literacy and numeracy classes in temporary learning spaces within informal tented settlements, or through homework support for those enrolled in Lebanese primary schools but in need of additional learning support. A pilot programme supported teachers and community leaders to organise play sessions for boys and girls living in temporary
    accommodation, informal tented settlements and rented accommodation, to provide safe spaces for social and emotional development, and opportunities for conflict resolution.

    In Turkey, working in partnership with the Ministry of Education, Concern supports schools for Syrian children living outside camps to access basic education (grades 1-9). Given the varied educational experiences and considerable trauma the children have experienced, there is a heavy emphasis on positive classroom management and psycho-social support for children.

    2. Efforts to support the capacities of local institutions in host countries must be maintained or increased. Concern’s programmes are designed, as much as possible, to support both refugee and host communities. For example, in North Lebanon Concern is enhancing the well-being of host community members and refugees through the improvement of community-based WASH infrastructure and services by implementing up to 8 water infrastructure and one waste water management project including borehole development, reservoirs and distribution networks, sewerage lines and drying beds, providing potable water and an improved sewerage management system of up to 50,000 people. In campaigning terms, we lobbying ongoing for our Governments and the EU to deliver on their ODA promises.

    3. Conflict prevention, mitigation, and resolution must be a much higher priority. Concern continues to advocate strongly for a political solution to the crisis at all levels, including with our supporters, policy makers as well as contributing to NGO coalition efforts
    at the country and global level to push for a political solution. To continue supporting the safe return of refugees and IDP’s, where appropriate, Concern’s activities include vector control, and rehabilitation of water and sanitation infrastructure. We are also helping men, women, girls and boys cope with trauma through psycho-social support in our education programs or through participatory, community-based protection programmes. These programmes also help to reduce violence against women and girls.

  • Rodrigo Schoeller de Moraes

    Dear Colleagues,
    I am a public prosecutor
    and manager of strategic projects for the Public Ministry/Public Prosecutor’s
    Office.
    In Brazilian
    Justice Administration System, the Public Ministry/Public Prosecutor’s Office
    has an extensive constitutional mandate that empowers it to act in many aspects
    and to strive to guarantee both the maintenance of Brazilians’ fundamental
    rights and the adequate conduct of governmental and private relationships and
    obligations, and to accuse alleged transgressors. With such a scope of action,
    it may prioritize and foster the development of cooperation networks amongst
    the many agencies and actors within the Justice Administration System, so as to
    not only act upon the consequences of the societal issues, but also on its
    causes. (further information on the documents available at the following
    website: rodrigoschoeller.blogspot.com.br. Mainly: 2010 publications in English and
    http://rodrigoschoeller.blogspot.com.br/2012/01/um-mapa-no-caminho-map-on-way-english.html )
    Regarding the subject: What does
    a Resilience Agenda look like for the protracted crisis in Syria and the
    region? We believe that it is fundamental to promote the development and
    management of cooperation networks that enable effectiveness, sustainability
    and peace (both internal and external). The
    formation of cooperation networks for systemic action allows the integration of
    the three sectors (public, private and civil society) and the whole community.
    This context favors democracy, participatory and representative, providing
    Harmonic and Sustainable Development (HDS).
    In order to act
    as such, we utilize the Systemic Management and Planning Action (PGS) on
    several prioritized foci (such as, for instance, the healthcare system).
    Through PGS Action, it is possible to enhance the convergences in detriment to
    eventual divergences.
    Presently, we are
    developing the Systemic Management and Planning Action focusing on Sustainable
    Development Goals (ODS) and on HABITAT III- HOW TO cooperate on the
    implementation and adaptation of the ODS and HABITAT III directives to local
    contexts. (further information on the documents available at the following
    website: http://pgsistemicos.blogspot.com.br/2015/09/apresentacao-criterios-e-matriz-de.html – including an English
    version). Should you wish to
    cooperate on our common mission, please submit a copy of this e-mail/document
    and/or the blog website (pgsistemicos.blogspot.com.br.) to your mailing list and/or send your
    suggestions to pgsblog@gmail.com
    Striving to
    contribute somehow and taking into consideration that PGS Action may be applied
    on any economic, social, environmental or geopolitical context (such as natural
    or anthropogenic catastrophes, on the refugees issue, on post-war
    reconstruction, etc.) we are explaining about PGS Action in many contexts, amongst
    which (the content of the manifests may further clarify the aforementioned):

    Participation in the Urban Dialogues of Habitat III (https://www.habitat3.org/the-new-urban-agenda/summaries):
    Esteemed Colleagues:
    In the Urban Dialogues we realize that there is a convergence with
    regard to WHAT TO DO.

    We believe it is very important to establish HOW TO DO. In other words,
    how to implement in practice the proposed.

    To this aim, the methodology/action of Systemic Planning
    and Management (PGS) was created. We believe that
    it can contribute in some way.

    As mentioned in the previous manifestation, this
    method allows, from the focus priority chosen and emphasizing the family
    context, vision, and resource integration, multidisciplinary and
    cross-disciplinary (and between institutions). Focus priority can be
    established, for example, in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in the
    thematic topics for the New Urban Agenda (social cohesion and equity, urban
    frameworks, spatial development, urban economy and urban ecology and
    environment), and, more specifically, in a flooding, in the construction
    of a hydroelectric plant, in the health of vulnerable populations,
    (indigenous population, homeless people, people affected by ecological
    catastrophes), in the improvement in the quality of life of the population of
    certain slum and etc.. Thus, one can establish what to do, and who, where and
    when / why and how to map and integrate all these components. Therefore, it is
    important to be perceived a common mission, to be implemented with the
    assistance of the physiological, psychological (safety, belonging and
    self-esteem) and self-fulfillment, generating commensurate impacts on the three
    pillars of sustainability (economic, social – health, education, citizenship
    and security – and the environment) and through cooperation
    networks. Thus, public effects are produced by adding value to sustainable
    activities.

    This
    common mission, envisioned as public purpose, requires and favors the formation
    of cooperation networks for systemic action, allowing the integration of the
    three sectors (public, private and civil society) and the whole community. This
    context favors democracy, participatory and representative, providing Harmonic
    and Sustainable Development (HDS), the consciousness of unity and survival of
    all living beings.

    Increasingly,
    it requires the cooperation of every part. However, sometimes, when making
    planning and management of public policy, some people forget the importance of
    integration, too, with the Justice System. In case of ineffectiveness of
    public policy (often due to a linear actuation – not realizing the
    interconnections), the Justice System undoubtedly will intervene, directly
    affecting the course of development that we want (something that can be
    evidenced by example, the “judicialization of health”). So the
    System of Justice should participate in the cooperation network.

    The Systemic Planning and Management action has achieved many
    positive results. Therefore, we are building, with the National Confederation
    of Municipalities, the document: Systemic Planning and Management action
    focusing on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and HABITAT III. HOW implement
    the ODS in the local community and in the context of the HABITAT III. Moreover, Starting on September 30, 2015,
    we will be promoting the implementation of the action of Systemic Planning and
    Management (PGS) in all municipalities of Brazil, with the National
    Confederation of Municipalities.

    We believe that this document (Systemic Planning and
    Management action focusing on Sustainable Development Goals and HABITAT III)
    can contribute to implementation of ODS and for the preparation of New Urban
    agenda. The document will be available at the following address:
    pgsistemicos.blogspot.com.br and rodrigoschoeller.blogspot.com.br, in early
    September (including an English version).
    Further
    information can be obtained in the following materials – at the same address
    and:
    1- What development do we want? – (an English version can
    be found on the link)
    quedesenvolvimentoqueremos.webnode.com/news/que-desenvolvimento-queremos-/
    2- Lecture Values, Systemic Planning, and Management and
    Public Ministry
    http://rodrigoschoeller.blogspot.com.br/2010/10/pgs-lecture-values-systemic-planning.html
    I hope
    that the documents, which are public domain, can contribute in some way.
    Rodrigo Schoeller de Moraes,
    Public Prosecutor,
    Manager Strategic Projects of the
    Public Prosecutors Office/Public Ministry.
    E-mail: rsmoraes@mprs.mp.br
    http://www.rodrigoschoeller.blogspot.com.br
    Phones:

    + 55 519628-4254

    +
    55 51 3295-1050

  • Bushra Hassan

    Resilience for any crisis
    must be developed at a human development level, irrespective of country,
    context or religion. With the ever increasing numbers of humanitarian crisis,
    the concern is not just to build resilience of the communities affected but the
    ensure that the world is available to support the humans in such a scenario.

    1. The pressure of such crisis mostly falls on the neighboring countries. In most of the cases the neighboring countries themselves are pressured for resources calls for a global response where countries (especially those who perpetuated the crisis in the first place) share the onus of taking on the individuals affected. Until governments and people responsible do not see the
    human face of the catastrophe, there will be an increasing number of such incidents globally.

    2. The approach of seeing a crisis as ‘muslim’, ‘middle eastern’, ‘african’ has to change. There are countries with more resources than others; many of whom have acquired wealth after centuries of colonial rule. There should be a way for these countries to carry more of the responsibility.

    3. The availability of opportunities and services to the refugees can only be resolved once they are not seen as ‘refugees’ but
    given ‘temporary nationality; – allowing them to take on productive roles in the new societies where they have been forced to settle.

    4. There has to be an acknowledgement that the refugees of war are often education, well read and productive members of
    society who can play such a role in any new country that is willing to adopt them.

    • simona marinescu

      Dear Bushra Hassan, these are points for reflection for the senior representatives of countries, international organizations, civil society, and corporations attending the Resilience Development Forum. In the current political order, rights are connected to nationality and are territorially defined. To become subject of international law and have rights outside your country’s jurisdiction, you should be covered by conventions, treaties, diplomatic status etc. The topic is complex and requires solidarity among relevant nations, which we have seen growing in recent years and hope to strengthen through dialog and partnerships. The UN has built a significant number of international instruments to protect people’s lives and we are confident that, whatever missing dots, this forum and the following events will close all loops and see more commitment towards restoring stability in the region. We hope you will follow the discussions in the coming days.

      • Bushra Hassan

        Dear Simona, I understand and agree with your response, except that:

        1. UN as a global body needs to be more assertive for the voice of the voiceless, even with members of the EB. Why rights of human beings are connected to geographical lines, why some humans have more rights than others is perhaps not just a philosophical question.
        2. There are several treaties and conventions but UN’s ability to monitor compliance to treaties and conventions (See: Palestine and Kashmir as one case in point) has been historically weak. It makes it difficult for UN to have the credibility to engage.
        3. If our mandate is now merely to provide service as much as is considered ‘acceptable’ by half the world, then we should understand that the discourse around resilience puts further burden on the communities at large – and perhaps we need to speak more about creating a global ‘enabling environment’ for resilience.

        Thanks.

  • Gustavo Gonzalez

    Dear all

    It gives me great pleasure to circulate the Dead Sea Resilience Agenda! Visit http://bit.ly/1MowrBf.

    The Dead Sea Resilience Agenda is expected to inform the next generation of responses to the Syrian Crisis, including through the development of innovative, multi-year financing mechanisms and instruments to enhance financial predictability; greater complementarity between humanitarian and development plans, processes, and activities.

    This document was circulated to all stakeholders in advance of the Resilience Development Forum, 8-9 November, Dead Sea. At this event we expect new and renewed commitments in the areas of social stability, aid architecture and the private sector.The Dead Sea Resilience Agenda requires political will to genuinely transform how we respond to protracted crisis.

    Thank you to those who have contributed to this ongoing online discussion. The comments here complemented the outcomes from the country consultations that occurred in Jordan, Turkey, Lebanon, Iraq, Egypt and Syria. People in this online discussion have called for a need to understand the root causes of the crisis and to listen to local solutions to build a more solid and inclusive dialogue.

    I encourage everyone to read the Dead Sea Resilience Agenda and continue to add your thoughts, ideas and recommended action to support the implementation of the Resilience Agenda. Due to the important input we have received, we are pleased to announce that this online discussion will be extended until November 10th allowing the opportunity for a rich discussion on the Dead Sea Resilience Agenda.

    During the conference, you can watch the proceedings on this site (resilience-forum.org) as they happen, and add your voice by using the hashtag #ResilienceForum on social media.

    With thanks and kind regards,

    Gustavo Gonzalez
    Sub-Regional Development Coordinator

    Sub-Regional Response Facility (Syria related-crisis)
    Twitter: @ggonzzalezz
    Amman, JORDAN

  • Italian Cooperation for Dev

    Resilience Development Forum (8-9 November 2015)

    ITALIAN POSITION PAPER

    The Syrian war, now in its fifth year, has already determined a huge displacement of civilians, notably the most significant after World War II, and has generated the largest emergency response of the international community of the last decades. Until
    peace and security are restored in Syria, further dramatic flows of refugees leading especially towards Europe might be expected.

    It appears, however, that the burden of the reception of refugees weights on the most vulnerable components of the societies of the Countries in this region. Therefore, the length of the Syrian crisis and its impact on the development perspective of the region has led to the necessity of a new approach, rethinking methods and finding new resources. What is now needed is a better aid architecture for resilience financing, ensuring social stability, strengthening economic growth and private sector and, last but not least, resilience of Syria.

    To tackle this challenge, we need flexibility and a tailor-made approach, which fully respects the host communities ownership and diversify its initiatives according to local needs and capabilities. It would be of paramount importance to seek:

    – an appropriate mix of national public capitals, private investments and international resources;
    – innovative financing tools for resilience and growth, such as budget support and debt relief;
    – the rationalization of the resources through the use of trust funds, such as the “Madad Fund” of the European Union;
    – the issuance of donor backed bonds to finance national resilience plans;
    – the reform of markets and the growth of production, also through public investments, in order to develop industrial zones: this would have positive impact on export, in reducing migration and in creating a regional production capability, also in view of reconstruction.

    The role of private sector as an agent of inclusive growth has to be strongly supported, especially through a comprehensive reform of labour market and an enhanced access to credit, that benefits both the refugees, and the communities that
    shoulder the social and economic consequences of their presence. The overall challenge is to include the most vulnerable social groups in the opportunities of the market-oriented economy.

    The Italian Cooperation focuses on strengthening the resilience of hosting communities. To this end, with a case-by-case tailored approach, Italy supports local authorities and their capabilities to provide social services. We work for job creation for the most vulnerable people of the hosting communities and for Syrian refugees. We give budget support in order to provide local
    communities with ownership. We actively contribute to the trust funds of the European Union (such as the “Madad Fund”). We support civil society through Italian NGOs. Last but not least, we advocate coordination with other donors.

    In conclusion, as “food for thought” for this Resilience Development Forum aimed at making aid architecture fit for resilience, we stress the importance of:

    – The role of local authorities in alleviating the hard conditions of refugees and of the poor of local communities;
    – Providing temporary access to work to Syrian refugees, in ways that should be consistent with the labour market reforms and the national security requirements;
    – The role of civil society and its partnerships with NGOs, as a landmark for people who have lost their reference points in their dramatic escape;
    – Budget support, to strengthen the ownership of the receiving Countries;
    – Trust funds, as a mean of handling aid flows, reinforcing the impact and avoiding fragmentation;
    – Finding new resources, such as concessional loans and debt conversion, as an alternative to mere emergency funding modalities;
    – The involvement of private sector in the region, in order to implement synergies between public and private investments, create new jobs and foster growth.

  • https://www.linkedin.com/in/patricklewismcnamara/ Patrick Mc Namara

    Thank you for sharing the well-crafted Resilience Agenda. Thinking about how the Dead Sea Resilience Agenda will be IMPLEMENTED, it’s important to note that we as organizations, governments, and leaders carrying out the agenda will need to BUILD OUR OWN RESILIENCE in order to successfully create conditions for resilience in the region.

    This will require a CULTURE OF RESILIENCE organizationally and personally:

    · Being comfortable with uncertainly and change (because that is normal in a complex crisis)
    · Taking calculated risks, experimenting, and learning from successes and mistakes
    · Creating real collaboration within and across our organizations, based on shared goals, authentic commitment, and aligned action
    · Working through difficult issues, listening, and deepening partnerships in order to build trust
    · Reflecting on the values, principles and deeper motivations that drive action and decisions and foster integrity

    Resilience requires new approaches – not just in what will be done, but in HOW all actors collaborate and work together. As mentioned, it requires engaging a wider range of stakeholders, adapting to changing circumstances, and taking a longer-term view with the ability to adapt to short-term changes because the situation continues to evolve. It requires understanding the needs of all stakeholders and generating solutions are beneficial for all stakeholders.

    The international community is learning from these complex, regional crises such as Ebola, the Sahel and the Syria crisis – taking a collaborative, whole-system approach and learning new ways successfully operate in a new paradigm.

    Best wishes for a successful forum.

  • Talaie El Houriat

    Dear all,
    Need to explore some links between resilience thinking and peace issues :
    1. Key for resilience
    2. Resilience capacities/ potentials and limits
    3. Resilience as new vision for Change
    4. Traditional systems
    5. Conflict Management
    6. Resilience response to the Syrian refugee crisis
    7. Disaster risk reduction
    8. Promote good Governance

    Thank you for sharing

  • simona marinescu

    Dear RDF online dialog partners,

    The first day of the forum was very productive. Over 400 officials representing governments, civil society, private sector, international organizations and media registered for the event. The Innovation and Resilience Marketplace hosts tens of booths with creative solutions that governments, civil society, private sector and UN agencies developed those years for people in need. Six roundtables on: children of Syria titled “No Lost Generation”, on gender and inclusive resilience building, local capacities for resilience, Iraq and the regional crisis, sustainable livelihoods, and migration and displacement fostered rich discussions on solutions within the frameworks of the national responses and the 3RP Plan. The importance of resilience as a bridge to irreversible progress was underscored by all speakers. Common challenges for all countries affected include insufficient data, weak monitoring systems, institutional and legislative gaps to adopt a resilience-based approach to development, cultural barriers, lack of funds. Solutions are needed now. Over 40% of Syrian children in Syria are out of school. One in two Syrian children inside and outside Syria are out of school. To support their education needs, UN agencies developed a wide range of written, audio and video products that could be used for learning in any environment in which children might be. Delivery of basic services are both part of the humanitarian response and of the resilience agenda as a critical underpinning for stability. Using technology for land management to support housing needs and restitution of properties was another solution tabled for discussions in the panel dedicated to local capacities, risk and vulnerability mitigation in the resilience response. The importance of youth and women as agents of change in the region was emphasized by all senior panelists. Monitoring implementation of the resilience agenda, measuring impact and making evidence-based decisions were identified as key joint UNDP-national counterparts priorities to ensure progress is steady and efforts are targeted to the neediest.
    Tomorrow is the big day of the RDF in which conclusions will be formulated and directions will be given by relevant UN senior executives, all present in the forum. Stay close for news in the coming hours.

  • galinafed

    Creating a place for an effective collaboration of a private and public sector will be extremely important, as well as an involvement of global communities in the process of assisting local actors. The key word here is “effective”. For that to happen there has to be an open mind to innovative ways to get things done. Building humanitarian capacity has to happen through a multi-stakeholder collaborative process, including local and national governments, international organisations, national and international NGOs, donors, and local businesses and farmers.
    My organization GOODdler (www.gooddler.com) offers an enterprise software to fight extreme poverty. It is a unique, evidence based, technology that offers a SaaS solution to civic and charitable organizations anywhere in the world to collect and manage in-kind donations. We provide an easy way to communicate the needs allowing organizations to create wishlists using local retailers (!) and farmers. Think of Gift Registry for Charitable organizations. It increases an effectiveness of Humanitarian Aid and provides a perfect technology for international development by involving local communities, strengthening local capacities, involving small businesses and local farmers in the efforts. It also gives an easy way for global communities to engage by organizing their individual efforts in the most effective ways. Anyone can purchase goods from the wishlists and be sure that these goods are delivered in the most effective way, locally.

    GOODdler is looking forward to an engagement with civic and private organizations involved in the process to see a progress on this issue.

  • http://synapse9.com/signals Jessie Henshaw

    We need to ask how healthy cultures replicate themselves, The reason is to begin learning about what goes wrong, finding out what happens when the transmission of a culture’s vital chains of inherited design are disrupted. That seems to be one of the clearest common elements in the new patterns of emerging failed or deeply dysfunctional societies we face, as an apparent symptom of modernity, that we seem to have a large role in creating.

    Among the worrisome realities is that the ever more competitive sectors of the world economies are putting the traditional societies and less competitive sectors “out of work”. That intrusion disrupts the replication of their cultures, eliminating the roles of the elders that once passed on their ancient knowledge of how to live. As one most tragic kind of “side effect” of growing inequity wealth you begin to see how widespread its effects are. The success of the leading economies is becoming an ever more disruptive external force around the world, not a healing force, perhaps the main source of all the dire problems we now face.

    The natural ways to avoid having the success of some parts of a system end in tragedy for the whole seem numerous in nature. It’s not something science ever found a way to study, in fact. That itself is a big part of the great “tragedy of the commons” we see emerging everywhere we look, how very ‘smart’ we are, but how unstudied in how to get along on earth we seem to be. These issues have had scientists and intellectuals throwing up their hands in dismay for centuries, calling them “wicked”.

    The emerging field “pattern language” can change that, expand the view of literally any science or discipline, as a truly revolutionary new model understanding system design. It offers a way of recognizing and describing the working designs of things that work as wholes, the self-contained units of organization we can identify by their own recognizable boundaries, complex internal processes , having a design that developed by a usually traceable process of growth and development.

    Those basic features, boundaries around complex interiors that developed their working designs by growth, are see in ALL these wicked problems we never had a good way to study before, but now potentially do. These natural objects of design are not controlled by external forces but develop behaviors that come from inside. Normal kinds of storms, cultures, enterprises, etc, all fit that same pattern too, one of the most common patterns of design in nature, that present as “objects” with their own local places in time and in relationships with others. What is called “object oriented science” is then the combined use of traditional science and pattern language to study these objects of organization by a method that seems likely to become a quite productive,

    The modern design of pattern language originated with the architect Christopher Alexander, but then began to spread to other fields. Notably it spread to the software development community in the 80’s, as a way to specify the unified sets of requirements for software components, to name and define their whole purposes. That allowed rich conceptual terminology and discussions of software design purposes. As software developed with complex individually organized parts connected in large systems it exhibits a design like nature’s way of creating complex designs with many scales of separately organized parts. It begs the question too, why does nature use parts?? Why doesn’t it just use laws, perhaps. Well it seems organizing things with independently organized parts is particularly productive. Every discipline could benefit from learning something about that!

  • Sarbjit Sahota

    Fragility or robustness of a States
    is largely linked to the level of maturity of politics in the country. The Governance of development is conditioned
    by the equity or inequity that the instruments of the state apply, which in
    turn manifests as level of stability or instability in a country.

    Two big factors have been
    playing out on the cause mentioned above.

    a. The international power centres (countries) who have multitude of interests in instability.

    b. Diaspora that fuel/fund lot of instability, some kind of nationalism (misguided)…….

    As a priority international community should support the ideas like more and more politicians should be working across various population groups. Any other aspects that can bring about political maturity in a country should be supported, encouraged and recognized.

  • Kelly Kirk

    As a Jordanian NGO involved in the 3RP response ARDD-Legal Aid was part of the initial response to the crisis, providing humanitarian assistance to the first Syrians crossing the border in 2011. The organization is now providing long term development programs by linking relief, rehabilitation and development which is essential for a national NGO when providing for the needs of the vulnerable. As the Resilience Development Forum wraps up, ARDD-Legal Aid would like to emphasize the following as being key to providing a more sustainable resilience based development agenda:

    1) Programming must address and work with both refugees and host communities to increase social cohesion. As the conflict continues, patience and welcome has worn thin and tensions are rising. The 3RP looks to build socially cohesive societies and has been successful in initial planning and programming, however more must be done to secure funding for long-term programmes to ensure sustainability. With funding decreasing, it is imperative to include local organizations in these responses as they have access to both host and vulnerable communities and will remain in the country long-term. Local NGOs have existing relationships in affected communities that will last past the crisis. These relationships allow local NGOs to encourage the inclusion of women, men, boys and girls to participate in building cohesive
    societies. Through resilience based development, focused on the inclusion of
    host and displaced communities, humanitarian and development actors can build the resilience of the affected population and stop the crisis from spreading further.

    2) By building the capacities of local organizations, the response can increase sustainability. In the last 50 years, Jordan has seen many refugees enter the country and local organizations have worked with these different groups of displaced people. Inclusion in the regional response plan allows organizations to share lessons learned in previous crises and enable them to ensure the application of best practices in each country. Working with local partners and expanding their capacities allows international organizations to have greater access to rural communities that may distrust new organizations. This results in greater inclusion of affected communities in program design which is necessary in creating sustainable solutions. For local organizations, partnering with international organizations and governments allow capacity building, sharing experiences and greater access, all of which can increase the sustainability of programming.

    3) Existing funding mechanisms must also be addressed. The humanitarian and development community is already looking towards this with the #ReshapeAid World Humanitarian Summit taking place in May 2016. Flexible funding has been a major part of these discussions as it allows for the adaptation of programming to the changing nature of the crisis. With funding needs not being met, donors allowing flexibility with their implementing partners see more innovative approaches that adapt to the needs of affected communities. This approach allows for resilience building programming that links humanitarian and development approaches within communities for a more positive impact. When linking relief, rehabilitation and development programmes, flexible funding lowers risks and increases sustainability. However, to ensure success, greater accountability and constant feedback from partners, donors and beneficiaries must be encouraged.

    ARDD-Legal Aid is encouraged by the outcomes of the Resilience Development Forum and looks forward to further discussion and action on these issues.

  • Renata Anna Jaksa

    Dear All,
    you have already collected great ideas and arguments, and although this crisis is immensely complex, I hope for resilience and development. I just wanted to point out 3+1 issues, mainly on the involvement of more funds and private funds:
    – The crisis has a major effect not only on Syria but on bordering countries and it approaches further. But in many countries in Europe the public discourse stops at whether migrants should be allowed in, or not, or to what extent. The problems in the countries around Syria are much less frequently mentioned, and potential solutions are not at all on the table of an average citizen or an average mid-size company. If more funds, especially private funds are wished to be involved, then the whole issue – and not as a problem and a tragedy but as an opportunity – has to be placed in the everyday discourse of these developed countries. It would be nice to see a matchmaking opportunity, a brokerage support on how to start to make business with a partner in small artifacts, or where to buy agricultural products that come from these regions. The issue of the Syrian crisis is right in the center of public awareness yet any of the potential ways to help fall out of the sight of the media for the average citizen/businessperson. I searched the keyword “Syria” on Kickstarter and there were only 30 projects found, most of them primarily with a cultural focus, not a social or economic one (with some exemptions).
    – The issue of transparency and monitoring is the second of key importance. Wherever large sums of aid/public funds move, the potential of corruption, fraud emerges and donors MUST be convinced that the funds and economic benefits are not misused by politicians, local autocrat. Especially not by extremists. My family kept on purchasing – hoping to support economic development in the region – a specific brand of dried fruits and nuts, until it turned out they were an IS-affiliated group.
    – Naturally, the local legal frameworks and business regulations should not be a barrier to the cooperations among private entities of the more developed countries and the local enterprises. But this must be analysed one-by-one by countries, and in some cases, by sectors.

    With a small organisation, ICEG, we are participating in various projects on economic development and I am looking for partners for an economic matchmaking/brokerage exercise.

    My last point is not so directly linked to the first three, but I just wanted to echo the need for schooling (and not only elementary school!), in order to avoid the reproduction of poverty, lack of skills, crime and spread of extremism.

    Many thanks for the organisers of this forum.

    • galinafed

      My company GOODdler (www.gooddler.com) is working on creating an infrastructure of local retailers in weak societies and to allow NGOs create wishlists using these local retailers and farmers. Think of it as “gift registry for NGOs” that utilizes local merchants and allows anyone in the world purchase goods from these lists and they will be delivered locally. I think this is in-line with what you are talking about. We had a very successful partnership in Nepal. Would like to talk more.

  • Salma Nashef

    Dear Gustavo…

    The agenda reflects great effort & includes shocking numbers about affected Syrians.

    I find it very impressive to include it different very important values.

    As a citizen of one of the regional countries which is Jordan, I can see that action 7 is very important, as we all know that Jordan is rich with human capacities & entrepreneurs
    which can help a lot in this crisis.

    Environment should be given more attention to get the best results.